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Any Energy Meter with Labview

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Hello friends

 

I have to monitor voltage, current, power, energy from energy meter to Labview. 

i never used energy meter with labview so i need suggest name / brand of any energy meter which can be easly connected with labview (RS232, RS485 or ethernet).

if any one have done this befor kindly suggest me energy meter name / model /.

i searched on internet and intrested to use any model of LOVATO energy which comes with RS485.

what would be communication method do i need to use to read its holding register to view voltage, current and other parameter on labview front pannel.

your support is required for this.

 

Thanks

Asif

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Message 1 of 12
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Since you mentioned it used RS-485 serial and also mentioned "holding register", that implies that the Lovato is using Modbus for communication.

 

You could certainly download the instruction manual for it and read it to know for sure!

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I had a very good experience using Accuenergy's Accivum series of power meters. They also used Modbus on rs-485 for communications.

 

Modbus is it's own animal and you would do yourself a huge favor to read up on what it is and how it works.

 

Here's a thread dedicated to the free LabVIEW Modbus library  that also links to the latest version.

 

 

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=== Engineer Ambiguously ===
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I have used the Yokogowa series of Power Meters with success over the years.  They can be controlled with LabVIEW using the SCPI protocol.

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What kind of accuracy and bandwidth needs to do you have? What's your budget? The instruments mentioned above will work wonderfully but they'll be hundreds of dollars.

 

I'll throw in another option- get a power monitoring smart switch (like the Sonoff S31), open it up and flash the Tasmota firmware, and set up an MQTT server on your computer or a Raspberry Pi, then use MQTT to talk to the monitor. I've done this and it works great for monitoring stuff around my house.

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@BertMcMahan wrote:

What kind of accuracy and bandwidth needs to do you have? What's your budget? The instruments mentioned above will work wonderfully but they'll be hundreds of dollars.

 


Actually a Yokogawa or any "laboratory grade" power analyzer can easily set you back $10,000-$15,000

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@RTSLVU wrote:

 


Actually a Yokogawa or any "laboratory grade" power analyzer can easily set you back $10,000-$15,000


Dang, while I didn't know they were that expensive, I think the OP just needs power monitoring, not power analysis. I imagined something more like a Kill-a-watt than a real honest-to-goodness power analyzer box. Sorry if I mislead about the pricing 🙂

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I'll second @RTSLVU with the Accuenergy Acuvim devices - they worked well for me too at a prior employer.  They are only a couple hundred bucks, and the default interface is ModBus.  I built a driver for them based upon their register map and layered over a ModBus library I'd rolled myself (for yet another instrument), which saved me lots of time.

 

If you go that route, I can share the library code.

 

Best of luck,

Dave

David Boyd
Sr. Test Engineer
Abbott Labs
(lapsed) Certified LabVIEW Developer
Message 8 of 12
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Along the lines of what @BertMcMahan said, for a step cheaper (perhaps) than the Acuvim (which are industrial quality DIN panel meters), you can try integrating a hobbyist-grade device like the Kill-a-watt.  I've no experience with them, but a former co-worker implemented a project with the WattsUp devices.  (They may be only available via Amazon at this point.)

 

I wrote a driver for those, too, which was a bit of a trip - the WattsUp ".NET" model is 10base-T and is set up to "phone home" to a configured IP address and report its readings on a periodic basis.  I created the driver as a TCP host/listener which could support multiple meters.

 

The meters themselves worked well with this approach, though our in-house metrology guy never really had a good calibration verification procedure - he ended up doing something with 60W incandescent bulbs and his traceable DMM.  That's what you get with hobbyist-level products sometimes.

 

Dave

David Boyd
Sr. Test Engineer
Abbott Labs
(lapsed) Certified LabVIEW Developer
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Depending what is wanted, and if you have a so called smart power meter in your home and just want to measure the full power consumption of your home rather than on individual outlets you could also access the serial port on those. Most of them offer an interface either based on M-Bus or Modbus, which are not the same at all.

Rolf Kalbermatter
Averna BV
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