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Deployed LabVIEW application on Windows SBC but major data usage issue

The application is for an edge device that control energy management in buildings - sampling at 1 Hz, taking control actions every 10-15 seconds ... we'd need something that was rugged and wide operating temperatures compliant a well. I'd looked into LINX for Raspberry Pi before but IIRC there were pain points at that time ... I couldn't just take my existing LabVIEW-based program and dump it on the Pi with LINX and get it to run. Especially custom libraries like NI Modbus etc ... but I could be wrong.

 

Don't really need I/O at this point. I'm essentially looking for a mini-pc that can support LabVIEW with a full enclosure. I'm currently using AAEON products. 

 

I'm curious - maybe I could get something like this and install Linux on it to get away from Windows entirely : https://www.aaeon.com/en/p/fanless-embedded-computers-boxer-6616 

 

It appears to satisfy the requirements for LabVIEW for Linux. Am i missing something - or could I seamlessly take my Windows-based LabVIEW code and transfer to the linux-target (compile and run it there)? I'm not using any DLLs or Windows-specific items.

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Message 11 of 17
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@ShivamSaxena wrote:

I'm currently using AAEON products. 

A company that lists the "power requirements" simply as 9-24V is a bit unclear of the concept. 😄

 

I could not find any mention of wattage anywhere (datasheet, manual, etc.)

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Message 12 of 17
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@altenbach wrote:

@rolfk wrote:

As to many people using computers with LTE or similar data connections. That is long gone!


There is definitely an important use case for cellular, especially since LabVIEW is often for measurements. Think of all the remote monitoring stations (weather, seismic, bridge strain, etc.) that are nowhere near any WIFI network and powered by solar. For really (really!) remote stations where the only connection is satellite this is even more serious. Still, it is probably rare that these use Windows 😄 )


I didn't say there isn't. But the OP pointed out that there must be many people with this problem and my comment was meant to indicate that it is far from common nowadays but really the exception to the rule.

 

And while Windows indeed has the notorious habit of doing lots of things in the background you can also have data accesses on other systems including Linux if you are not careful.

 

@ShivamSaxena wrote:

The application is for an edge device that control energy management in buildings - sampling at 1 Hz, taking control actions every 10-15 seconds ... we'd need something that was rugged and wide operating temperatures compliant a well. I'd looked into LINX for Raspberry Pi before but IIRC there were pain points at that time ... I couldn't just take my existing LabVIEW-based program and dump it on the Pi with LINX and get it to run. Especially custom libraries like NI Modbus etc ... but I could be wrong.

The main problem with Raspberry Pi is IMHO the SD Card. This is a rather unreliable memory option for a headless, always on device. It's cheap though and easy to setup on the desktop computer with a simple SD card reader and these are the main reason they use it. Rather sooner than later the Raspi will however not startup anymore after a power failure due to damaged SD card. The Raspberry Pi Compute Modules are better in that respect but they require an extra carrier board of some sort.

 

Don't really need I/O at this point. I'm essentially looking for a mini-pc that can support LabVIEW with a full enclosure. I'm currently using AAEON products. 

 

I'm curious - maybe I could get something like this and install Linux on it to get away from Windows entirely : https://www.aaeon.com/en/p/fanless-embedded-computers-boxer-6616 

 

It appears to satisfy the requirements for LabVIEW for Linux. Am i missing something - or could I seamlessly take my Windows-based LabVIEW code and transfer to the linux-target (compile and run it there)? I'm not using any DLLs or Windows-specific items.


Pretty much all SBCs that can run Windows 64-bit will also run Linux x64 in some form. Since you want to go simple and not have a desktop system, try to get some minimalistic configuration. LabVIEW for Linux installs easiest into RPM based distributions but can also be installed into Debian based Linux distributions with a little extra work.

 

Running your LabVIEW program under Linux may not be a simple load and run experience depending on what your program does. Linux does not only use different shared library formats but also different file paths and a few other things. So there might be a little work to do before your program runs under LabVIEW for Linux.

Rolf Kalbermatter
My Blog
Message 13 of 17
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Hi,

 

Can we deploy LabVIEW application on Rock Pi X board ?

 

https://wiki.radxa.com/RockpiX

 

Thanks, 

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Message 14 of 17
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It depends what you want to do: Build an executable for Windows and deploy it? No luck. The Rock Pi is an ARM platform and does not know what to do with a Windows executable!

 

Using the Linx Toolkit (or LabVIEW Community Edition which already comes with that included)? Theoretically yes, practically it's a bit of a difficult thing to do. The Linx Toolkit only supports Raspberry Pi's out of the box (and that out of the box depends on many things, including the Raspberry Pi version and Raspbian OS version you want to use).

 

There is no pre build LabVIEW chroot for the Rock Pi and building one on your own is only an option if you know a very great deal about Linux in general and Raspberry Pi in special.

Rolf Kalbermatter
My Blog
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Message 15 of 17
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Rock Pi X is x86(intel) processor based board. We can install windows 10 on it. Hence I was asking. 

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Message 16 of 17
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In that case I see no reason why it shouldn't work. I did not see the X at the end of model, all other Rock Pi's are ARM based. As long as it is full Windows 10, or Windows 10 IoT Enterprise, it contains a Win32 subsystem and can run LabVIEW. You can also run normal LabVIEW for Linux on an according Linux installation if you wish. Installing this is as easy (or tricky 😁) as on any other x64 desktop Linux PC.

 

Installing hardware drivers may be a little more tricky. I have no idea how compatible it is with a normal PC in that respect.

Rolf Kalbermatter
My Blog
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Message 17 of 17
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