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Version Migration

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I would like to import my instrument library from one version of LabVIEW to a
newer version. Is there a tutorial or instruction document on how to do this?

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What is the old and new version? Most code will open just fine in a newer version. Do you get broken VIs? What kind of other drivers and external code is used by your drivers? 

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I don't know of any specific tutorial, but it is a pretty easy process, so just a few tips.

 

1.  Make a backup of your instrument library and put it somewhere safe so that if something gets messed up, you can always go back to the original, or at least look at it while trying to fix the new.

 

2.  Open your copy of the library in the newer version.  LabVIEW will automatically convert it.  Look for a broken run arrow and read any error in case something needs to be fixed because of changes between versions.  (More likely to happen with a big jump in LV version rather than smaller ones.)  When you go to close, it will ask you to save the VI's before closing.  Go ahead and do that.

 

3.  Under Tools>Advanced there is an option called Mass Compile.  You can use that on a directory or library to upgrade all of the subVI's in one step.

 

3.  Tools >> Advanced

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@SPC_NH wrote:

I would like to import my instrument library from one version of LabVIEW to a
newer version. Is there a tutorial or instruction document on how to do this?


Yes, Each version of LabVIEW ships with a document called LV_Upgrade_Notes.pdf in <LabVIEW>\Manuals\

 

Read it and follow the directions.  Fairly simple.  

Spoiler
I'm slightly surprised that those two fellow Knights forgot about that document

"Should be" isn't "Is" -Jay
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@JÞB wrote:

Read it and follow the directions.  Fairly simple.  

Spoiler
I'm slightly surprised that those two fellow Knights forgot about that document

I was waiting for version information before trying to give specific answers. Maybe he needs to convert form LabVIEW 2 to LabVIEW 4, in which case the 2017 upgrade notes would be inappropriate. 😄

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@altenbach wrote:

@JÞB wrote:

Read it and follow the directions.  Fairly simple.  

Spoiler
I'm slightly surprised that those two fellow Knights forgot about that document

I was waiting for version information before trying to give specific answers. Maybe he needs to convert form LabVIEW 2 to LabVIEW 4, in which case the 2017 upgrade notes would be inappropriate. 😄


The rel path and filename are the same


"Should be" isn't "Is" -Jay
Message 6 of 22
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LabVIEW Version 11 to 12 to 13 to 14 to 15 to 16 to 17

 

 

 

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altenbach wrote:  Maybe he needs to convert form LabVIEW 2 to LabVIEW 4

Open up the code in LabVIEW 3 and save.  Open up the code in LabVIEW 4 and save.  Then say "Why the !@#$@# am I trying to use some REALLY old code that likely will not work on a modern computer?"

 

BTW, the mass compile crashes LabVIEW 3 on my computer.  Seems to work fine in LabVIEW 4.

 

Back on the serious note: Follow everything RavensFan already stated.  That will get you 95% there.  The upgrade notes will tell you of any glaring possible issues you might have to fix.


GCentral
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Do you need all of those intermediate versions?  If you are trying to go from LabVIEW 2011 to LabVIEW 2017, I might be tempted to try it in a single step (as the LabVIEW 2011 code won't be using "new features" developed subsequently).  You do want to inspect all of the VIs for Broken Arrows (and if there are not too many of them, it's not a bad idea to look at the Block Diagram, as some functions such as Invoke and Property Nodes might show "pink" choices for "Deprecated" functions, and you'd be advised to replace them with "what we are doing now".  If this makes too much of a mess, try 2011 to 2014 to 2017.

 

Bob Schor

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@SPC_NH wrote:

LabVIEW Version 11 to 12 to 13 to 14 to 15 to 16 to 17


1. Save a copy of your library somewhere safe.  A good software control repository is preferred.

2. Open up LabVIEW 2017 and go to Tools->Mass Compile.  Select the folder holding your library and run.  Depending on the size of your library and any missing dependencies, this could be really fast or really slow.  You can read the report afterwards to see if any VIs were broken during the process.

3. Go through the upgrade notes for 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017 and make sure there is not anything in there that would affect your library.  I do not know of anything through those version that might trip you up, but it is still worth checking.  To save some time, you may be able to work backwards (start with the 2017 upgrade notes) and then check the first version mentioned in there (without looking, I would guess 2014) and keep going like that until you reach 2011.


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