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Lets hail King Ben!!!!


Vaibhav wrote:

@ Parth,

 

(I would not use Partha, as Parth is the correct spelling - like Yog, not Yoga.


Parth is the correct spelling only for Bengalis [I ve a fren in Bhopal who is a native of Calcutta(now Kolkata)], afaik...  He calls me so. BTW, are you a Bengali... ?! Smiley Wink

 

For the rest of India, it is by default Partha, for the full name Parthasarathi. Smiley Happy

 


Vaibhav wrote:

@ Parth,

 

But ok, it's your name, you can spell as you wish. 😉 )


Yeah, it is my name & you should spell/pronounce like the way I do, not as you wish (like muks has insisted here). Smiley Happy

- Partha ( CLD until Oct 2021 🙂 )
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Yeah, it is my name & you should spell/pronounce like the way I do, not as you wish (like muks has insisted here).

 

 

You are going to drag me everywhere for the meaning arent you? :smileywink:

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Ben wrote:

 

I worked with a guy that struggled with choosing the right name for his son.


Ben, one more difference in English usage in India (at least). We normally dont refer to person(s) with the pointer 'that'. Instead, we use, "I worked with a guy who struggled with choosing the right name for his son.".

 

We use pointers of respect to differentiate human beings from animals & things. Smiley Happy

- Partha ( CLD until Oct 2021 🙂 )
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muks wrote:

 

You are going to drag me everywhere for the meaning arent you? :smileywink:


Yes. Smiley Very Happy Till the time you tell us...

- Partha ( CLD until Oct 2021 🙂 )
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parthabe wrote:

Ben wrote:

 

I worked with a guy that struggled with choosing the right name for his son.


Ben, one more difference in English usage in India (at least). We normally dont refer to person(s) with the pointer 'that'. Instead, we use, "I worked with a guy who struggled with choosing the right name for his son.".

 

We use pointers of respect to differentiate human beings from animals & things. Smiley Happy


 

Well I did expect to learn something and I have. Now as far as the difference between "that" and "who", I'll ask my wife to explain the difference to me. Smiley Happy She is the one that has multiple languages mastered. I'm still working on english (and the odds are bad that I'll get that one figured out).

 

 

Ben

Retired Senior Automation Systems Architect with Data Science Automation LabVIEW Champion Knight of NI and Prepper LinkedIn Profile YouTube Channel
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Ben wrote:
She is the one that has multiple languages mastered.

Habits are hard to change, Ben. Smiley Very Happy

- Partha ( CLD until Oct 2021 🙂 )
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Ben wrote: I'm still working on english (and the odds are bad that I'll get that one figured out).

Whenever you have trouble you can just use the Bruce Willis line from The Fifth Element: "Lady, I only speak two languages - English and bad English".


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Try to take over the world!
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My apologies for dragging everyone into a language class 😉


 

parthabe wrote:

Parth is the correct spelling only for Bengalis

For the rest of India, it is by default Partha, for the full name Parthasarathi. Smiley Happy


First of all, "Parth" (पार्थ - I'm talking about Arjun's name, so please allow me to write without the trailing "a" 😉 ), is a word from Sanskrit, and not from Bengali. So all the languages, derived from Sanskrit, and those which accepted the name "Parth," use it as it is in its purest form, except those which changed Parth into their own pronounciations (yes, sometimes names are "altered" too).

 

As for the name Parth or even Parthasarathi, all the North/East/West/South Indian languages use this name as it is. For all the non-Indians, I would try to explain as I can. In the course of evolution (of languages) during the past 1000 years, the South Indian languages have become drastically different, in the written form (script) - they were already different in the vocal and grammar form. Tamil is considered to be more ancient than the Northern languages. (I have been lucky to study a little bit of this evolution, merely 1%, during my previous project in India - about image processing, where I was the project leader.) NEVERTHELESS, the Southern languages also use the term Parthasarathi.

 

And it is in the South Indian languages, that most of the Sanskrit/Hindi characters are altered, with an extra trailing sound either to match with their other pronounciations (quite understandable), or to match with what Britishers left behind - the trailing "A" in almost everything. Britishers changed even the name of our country - Hind > (H)Ind > India 😞

The original Indian name for "India" is "Bharat" (from the name of the king Bharat), which is also altered as Bharata (my South Indian friend uses Bharatha/Bharath, and I fight with her 😄 )

 

Likewise, Bengalis change the Sanskrit words not necessarily in the end, but their change is usually adding an "O", so they change "Shubh" (means "Well/happy" as in "Happy New Year") to "Shubho."

 

In my post about the meaning of names, I wrote something about full consonents. Ok, will try to explain.

 

The word "Parth" is written, in Devanagari script (used for Sanskrit, Hindi, Punjabi, Gujarati, Marathi, Bengali with some alterations), as पार्थ where as "Partha" is written as पार्था. Did you notice that extra ा (minus the dotted circle which is just to show relative position of the alphabet) in the end? In Indian scripts we have alphabets for consonents, whereas symbols like ा,ी,ौ,ं,ु etc, for sounds like  a, i, au, (nasal n), u, respectively, for vowels.

Taking another example, of the word Yog (altered as Yoga), in Hindi and Gujarati (two modern day languages using the same script - Devanagari, with a little modification).

 

Yog -  Hindi योग - Gujarati યોગ

Yoga - Hindi योगा - Gujarati યોગા

 

Do you see the extra trailing vertical lines in the second row terms?

 

Now for a little bit advanced class (not very advance, just intermediate - but the warning was to stop you from reading if you're getting bored). 

 

The reason behind that extra "a" is that, as I explained before, to make sure the ending consonent is taken "complete" and not half.

If the consonent is "complete" and if another word is joined with this word, the last consonent doesn't form a complex character. Yes! In Indian scripts, just as we use signs for vowels, we also form "complex/compound" characters by joining two or more (could be 5 or 7) "consonent" characters and form a single character.

Adding many vowels to a single consonent just adds more signs surrounding the consonent, but adding a consonent to a half consonent makes a new character (looks different from the previous character, and does not exist in the "basic" alphabets). Yes, in Indian languages we have "basic" alphabets and there is practically no limit for complex alphabets (if you know Prakrit - mother of Sanskrit 🙂 )

 

So, in "Parth" (पार्थ) the trailing "rth" (र्थ) is already a complex character, formed by R + Th ( र् + थ = र्थ , like in Dharm: ध + र् + म = धर्म, no need to say Dharma, because it's धर्मा). But this र्थ is finally a complete character, and not a half or incomplete, otherwise it would be र्थ् (like half र् which is full र + ्).

 

So adding something further to र्थ will not change it, but will be added in the next position. So Parth (पार्थ) + Sarathi (सारथी) = Parthasarathi (पार्थसारथी) and not Parthsarathi (पार्थ्सारथी).

 

If you noticed while joining Parth and Sarathi, an "a" is added which indicates that "rth" doesn't form a complex character with "s," but remains a complete character.

 

For this reason, in English, many times, the extra "a" is written, just to mention that the trailing consonent is a complete character already. Of course, a complete character can further be converted to incomplete character by adding the half character sign ् .  It's like in Chemistry, that you form a negative ion and a positive ion out of a stable formula, by adding an extra electron. 

 

But this extra "a" misguides to non-Indians and if you are interested in speaking the correct pronounciation, and writing correct spellings, then you should avoid "a". A lot of literature, under the Western influence, is written with extra "a" everywhere. I personally, do not like to alter words of any language, and deform them. I like the English as it is and Russian as it is. So I could say "I don't have problem in understanding, so why should I read with an extra a everywhere."

But, I accept it as part of the "transliteration." So no issues with that one. But a worse part of this story is that, there are speakers, Indian speakers, who even pronounce this extra "a" and that's the height. I mean, if someone has problem in understanding something, we should explain the correct thing and not change it to that particular someone's likings.  

 

In our case, Parthabe has chosen his name to be Partha. So be it. I respect that. I wrote in my previous post, that it's his name, so he can spell as he wishes.

 

Above, I just explained the reality about the Sanskrit term "Parth" and "Parthasarathi."

 

 

BTW, are you a Bengali... ?!

 

From my previous post where I mentioned about Navratri festival, I thought you might have got the clue dude. 😉

I am from Gujarat, but I am a human being and an Indian.

Someone might just think here, "oh, these Indians have a lot of differences and prejudices and they treat each other as from their state and not as Indians." Well, we treat each others as Indians, it's just that India is full of diversity, and cultural differences could be more than what you might think of differences between an American and a European. 🙂 Nevertheless there are many cultural similarities.

I hope the world to be a big family, when the mankind finally advances into a better level of civilisation (or is that already a history?)

 

Good observation about that and who.

Message Edited by Vaibhav on 09-29-2009 10:30 PM
Vaibhav
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As I already wrote, Parth is Arjun's name, and Parthasarathi is Lord Krishna's name.

 

Here is an artist's imagination about the famous scene from Mahabharat, where Parthasarathi explains the meaning of life, duties and Dharm to Parth, the speech, more famously known to the world as Geeta. The reason behind that was to explain real meaning of one's duties (Dharm/Dharma) to Arjun while he was confused (and destracted from his path) when he sees his (cousin) brothers, Gurus, great grandfather in front of him in the battlefield, and puts his weapons down. Because he loves them and respects all the elders whom he has to fight now, who have taught him the art of battle. They also have a lot of love in their heart for Arjun, but are also bound by their duties, and have to fight him, though except those cousin brothers, nobody wants to kill Arjun. Such a moment, when the God himself gives him lesson of Truth and explains him what to do - as recorded in Geeta - is when God becomes driver of a man who has to fulfil his duties. That's the essence of the name Parthasarathi.

mahabharat_war.gif

krishna-instructs-arjuna1.jpg

Krishna_Geeta.jpg

Mahabharat.jpg

 

This is one of my favourite paintings of all time, gives a lot of peace and guidance (since I know the story behind it). And the mythological stories / epics are basically lessons with symbolic characters which we can identify with our lives in the modern age as well.

 

PS: Shared all this just out of my desire to share something good and positive that someone may learn from. This is not about "Religous" stuff. 😉

Vaibhav
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Vaibhav wrote:

 

My apologies for dragging everyone into a language class 😉


All I can say is, "Wow! Great post!" Smiley Happy

- Partha ( CLD until Oct 2021 🙂 )
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