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NI PXI 4351 read temperature

Hi,

 

I'm trying to read temperature from TBX-68T connected to NI PXI-4351.

I see PXI-4351 in my hardware explorer, it show me right data in test panel.

But, I can't found any tools for reading temperature in LabView!

I installed drivers for NI PXI 4351

http://joule.ni.com/nidu/cds/view/p/id/285/lang/en

but still noresults. Driver didn't contain any examples for reading.

I use LabView 10 and I have NI DAQ Traditional 7.4.4

 

so, I confused. How read temperature?

 

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When you installed the drivers for the device, it installed a folder of examples.  They should be located at C://>>Program Files>>National Instruments>>LabVIEW 2010>>instr.llb>>ni435x>>ni435x.llb.  This will contain a list of examples.  Hope this helps!

 

Thanks,

 

Sean

Applications Engineering Specialist - Semiconductor Test
National Instruments
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I have several PXI-4351 Temp/Voltage cards that I'd like to use with a 64-bit Win7 system.  The cards are installed in a PXI-1042 chassis, and the chassis is connected to the 64-bit Win7 PC via a PXI-8360 - PCIe-8361 interface kit.  After being unable to see the modules via the Measurement and Automation software panel, unsuccessfully installing the NI-435x v2.5.2 driver software (error message indicating that NI-RFSA does not support 64-bit OS), and then finding the post "National Instruments product compatibility for microsoft windows 7", it certainly seems that this device isn't going to work with 32 or 64 bit versions of Win 7.  Are there plans to update these drivers, or is this card only going to be compatible with 32-bit, less then Win7 operating systems?

 

thanks,

 

Brian

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Unfortunately, this device is scheduled for obsolescence on Septemeber 1, 2011.  Because of this, there is not plan to update the drivers, as this device has it's own specific drivers.  The recommended replacement is the PXIe-4353, which uses the DAQmx drivers.  These drivers are used by our multifunction DAQ cards, as well as some various other cards, so it would seem that our support for this replacement would include further updates to the driver.  You are correct in that the 4351 is only supported in Windows XP 32-bit.

 

Thanks,

 

Sean

Applications Engineering Specialist - Semiconductor Test
National Instruments
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Thank you Sean. 

 

The perils of aging equipment.

 

regards,

 

Brian

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@Sean_N wrote:

Unfortunately, this device is scheduled for obsolescence on Septemeber 1, 2011.  Because of this, there is not plan to update the drivers, as this device has it's own specific drivers.  The recommended replacement is the PXIe-4353, which uses the DAQmx drivers.  These drivers are used by our multifunction DAQ cards, as well as some various other cards, so it would seem that our support for this replacement would include further updates to the driver.  You are correct in that the 4351 is only supported in Windows XP 32-bit.

 

Thanks,

 

Sean




Sean,

 

When will the PXI-4353 become available?  The PXIe-4353 won't fit into our PXI Chassises.

 

Kevin

 

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Hi kmcdevitt,

 

The SC Express product family was specifically designed to take advantage of the PXIe architecture and therefore the timing circuitry on the PXIe-4353 is not designed to be compatible with the PXI platform.  There are no plans to design any of the SC Express products in the PXI form factor.

Regards,

Jared R.
Precision DC Product Support Engineer
National Instruments
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@JaredRo wrote:

Hi kmcdevitt,

 

The SC Express product family was specifically designed to take advantage of the PXIe architecture and therefore the timing circuitry on the PXIe-4353 is not designed to be compatible with the PXI platform.  There are no plans to design any of the SC Express products in the PXI form factor.


Jared,

 

Please explain what it is that makes the PXIe-4353 so special that there can not be a PXI-4353.

 

This 32-Channel, 24-Bit, Thermocouple Input Module does 90 S/s/ch sample rate in high-speed mode or 1 S/s/ch sample rate in high-resolution mode.  Surely you are not claming the the PXI platform's architecture and timing circuitry can not hadle the troughput generated by the 32 channels of 24bit data at 90Hz.

 

Jared, it is not a pleasent fealing to be prommised that the new signal conditioning cards are going to be made for your soon to be purchased PXI-1045 chassises, and later find out from an Applications Engineer Jared that it has been in the plans to never make PXI versions of signal conditioning cards.  How would you feel if you purchased about 30 PXI-1045 18 slot chassises with PXI Embedded RT controllers with the promiss that if you bought the controllers and chassises that NI would continue to develope new Signal Conditioning and Other PXI Cards for your chassises.  Just buy them, and the new PXI cards will come.  How would you feel when you were told to be patient and just wait till next years NI week.  How patient would you be after the second year of being told to be patient until the next year's NI week?  How patient would you be after the third year of being told to be patient until the next year's NI week?  I have been recently asked to be patient again.  NI Week 2012, there may be something.  And now you tell me that there will never be anything.

 

I just don't buy it that there is something about the PXIe architecture and therefore the timing circuitry that is required for 90 Hz data.

 

Kevin.

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Kevin-

 

Jared should verify this, but one reason could be that these modules use a delta-sigma converter which requires oversampling by many times. Although the final sample rate may be 90 S/s/ch, the delta-sigma utilizes oversampling and averaging to obtain 24-bit precision. Also, this device is multiplexed, meaning that there is a need for a convert clock (to scan through each channel). To be able to sample multiplexed channels, the clock speed would have to be the number of channels times the desired sample rate. Also, for other modules within this family, the PXIe 100 clock (reference clock) is necessary for timing and synchronization. This clock is only present on the PXIe chassis.

 

With regards to PXI versus PXIe, the PXI chassis is based on the PCI standard, while PXIe is based on the PCIe standard, which increases the bandwidth significantly (and improves the bottle-necking that can occur). The above reasons maybe part of the reason these cards were developed for PXIe; there was a need for the increased bandwidth. Jared will have to verify with the developers on more detail, but these are just some observations that may allude to our reasoning for developing this in the PXIe platform. I hope this helps!

 

Thanks,

 

Sean

Applications Engineering Specialist - Semiconductor Test
National Instruments
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@Sean_N wrote:

Kevin-

 

Jared should verify this, but one reason could be that these modules use a delta-sigma converter which requires oversampling by many times. Although the final sample rate may be 90 S/s/ch, the delta-sigma utilizes oversampling and averaging to obtain 24-bit precision. Also, this device is multiplexed, meaning that there is a need for a convert clock (to scan through each channel). To be able to sample multiplexed channels, the clock speed would have to be the number of channels times the desired sample rate. Also, for other modules within this family, the PXIe 100 clock (reference clock) is necessary for timing and synchronization. This clock is only present on the PXIe chassis.

 

With regards to PXI versus PXIe, the PXI chassis is based on the PCI standard, while PXIe is based on the PCIe standard, which increases the bandwidth significantly (and improves the bottle-necking that can occur). The above reasons maybe part of the reason these cards were developed for PXIe; there was a need for the increased bandwidth. Jared will have to verify with the developers on more detail, but these are just some observations that may allude to our reasoning for developing this in the PXIe platform. I hope this helps!

 

Thanks,

 

Sean


Sean,

 

Oversampling data does not make its way as throughput on the PXI (or PXIe) backplane.  I seams to me that if a PXI-4462 can oversample to yield 204800Hz 24bit samples on 4 channels, then a PXI-4353 should, if it existed, be able to yield 1Hz 24bit data on 32 channels.  Multiplexing is not some thing new that came about as a result of PXI Express.  Please do the math before you claim that 1Hz data throughput requires PXI Express.  All of you comments seem to be irrelevent for a card producing on 90 S/s/ch.  Please, Sean it would have been nise to have done some math before you commented.

 

Kevin.

 

 

 

 

 

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