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Do you need intuitive application software to manage software deployment, device configuration, and diagnostics? Meet SystemLink™ software!

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  • Software
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A unique software learning experience crafted by our outstanding and innovative LabVIEW Champions

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Test is changing, and your job isn’t getting any easier. The tools you use must evolve with the demands of smarter devices under test. 

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Test smarter with the latest enhancements to LabVIEW NXG

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If you ask Brian Hoover to summarize what LabVIEW does for him in one sentence, he’d say “LabVIEW makes my work fun.” We couldn’t have said it better ourselves. 

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Fast, Flexible, and Web-Ready

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Two ways you can solve your Big Analog Data challenges

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In my last blog post, I discussed the type of data test engineers are collecting. The key takeaway: we’re dealing with a lot of data.

 

All this data leads to my next topic: the three biggest problems test engineers face. At

NI, we refer to these collectively as the Big Analog Data problem.

big_analog_data_infographic_feature.jpgFinding the Valuable Data Points in a Mountain of Data

 

All the data from the increasingly complex tests run every day eventually needs to be stored somewhere, but it's often stored in various waysfrom a local test cell machine to an individual employee’s computer. Simply locating the data you need to analyze can be a giant pain, let alone trying to sift through pages of meaningless file names and types without metadata for context.

 

We see too many of our customers wasting time because they don't have an efficient way of searching files. Even if engineering groups are lucky enough to have a centralized database to store test data, they still run into difficulties accessing it because it’s not optimized for waveform data types and rarely shared between groups.

 

All of this leads to “silos” of data that then can’t be used efficiently, causing more wasted time trying to access it. In extreme cases, these problems even cause companies to rerun tests because they simply can’t find data they’ve already collected.

Validating Data Collected

 

 

An issue that most don’t think about until they experience it firsthand is the validation of collected data. Ideally, every test runs the way it’s intended to, but there’s no way to know, unless some validation steps are performed.

 

There are countless ways to get incorrect data, from improper test rig setup to data corruption. If invalid data goes on to be analyzed and used in decision-making, there could be disastrous results.

 

Big Analog Data validation presents extra headaches due to the sheer volume and variety of data types. A gut-wrenching example of this is NASA’s 1999 Mars Climate Orbiter that burned up in the Martian atmosphere because engineers failed to convert units from English to metric.

 

Manual processes work, but are extremely time-consuming. To save engineers from wasting valuable person-hours, an automated solution is usually required.

Analyzing Large Volumes of Data Efficiently

 

 

Studies show that on average only five percent of all data collected goes on to be analyzed. By not analyzing more of the data you collect, you risk making decisions without considering the bigger picture.

 

A great way to illustrate this in the engineering world is the Nyquist Theorem, which states that you must use a minimum number of data points in your analysis to get accurate results. For example, without analyzing more data points, you may just see an exponential signal (Figure 1) instead of the sine wave that’s actually there (Figure 2).

 

 Picture1.pngFigure 1Picture2.pngFigure 2

There are two reasons why test engineers don’t analyze more data. The first, as I mentioned earlier, is being unable to find the right data in the mountains of Big Analog Data they’ve collected. But, they’re also using systems and processes that aren’t optimized for large data sets. Manual calculations with inadequate tools are typically the roadblock when it comes to analyzing large quantities of data.

 

Even when the right tools are used, processing Big Analog Data can be troublesome and usually requires an automated solution where processing can be offloaded to a dedicated system. 

 

In my next post, I’ll give you some options for tackling your Big Analog Data problem, so you can be sure you’re making the best data-driven decisions possible.

 

NEXT:Addressing Your Big Analog Data Challenges >>

 

Find out more about NI’s solutions for data-driven decisions >>

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NI Booth Still - ATE Europe.JPG

 

Wireless engineers face a big challenge today. They must prototype next-generation wireless communications systems and increasingly connected devices in a more competitive and fast-changing communications industry.

 

European Microwave Week (EuMW) 2017, a six-day event in Nuremberg, will focus on the future of microwave technology globally and give us a better look at how this challenge is impacting the industry today and changing the way engineers work.

 

Look for the following topics at EuMW 2017:

 

5G prototyping: the progress we have made

 

5G continues to capture headlines as wireless companies everywhere take on the challenge of building a 5G wireless network. NI’s engagement with industry leaders in 5G prototyping has resulted in MIMO systems with world record-breaking spectrum efficiency, including one of the world’s fastest mmWave channel sounders.

 

NI at EuMW: We’ll demonstrate a real-time, 28 GHz, over-the-air prototype aligned with the Verizon 5G specification. We’ll also showcase an academic partnership enabling research on ultra-reliable, low-latency wireless communications for mobile video recording and broadcasting. Follow @NIglobal for updates during the show.

 

5G EuMW.jpeg

 

 

Sensor fusion test: a key part of the race towards autonomous vehicles

 

As automakers race to produce autonomous vehicles, sensors like cameras, lidar, GNSS, and radar are making automotive test much more complex. Due to the speed at which this industry trend is evolving, shows like EuMW help us keep up with the progress towards making sensor fusion test faster and safer. This is critical for automotive suppliers to remain competitive as we move toward more connected autonomous cars.

 

NI at EuMW: We’ll demonstrate an advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) test solution, developed in collaboration with Germany’s ADAS IIT consortium, for short- and long-range radar at 76–81 GHz. The solution is based on the industry-standard PXI modular instrumentation platform. Using PXI’s timing, triggering, and synchronisation capability, along with instruments from DC to RF and bus interfaces like CAN, this system provides an ideal solution for testing sensor fusion. Follow @NIglobal for updates during the show.

 

Also, in the MicroApps theatre, NI distinguished engineer Paul Khanna will discuss high-performance test techniques for automotive radar sensors at 12:30 p.m. on Wednesday, 11 October.

 

ADAS_iiT_Sensor_Fusion.png

 

Software: the solution for faster and smarter microwave design and test innovation

 

As wireless capability is integrated into a dramatically growing number of devices, manufacturers increasingly need to test larger volumes of connected devices. This makes it even more important to efficiently design, deploy, and maintain automated wireless test systems. Productive development software is key to achieving the goal of efficiently creating test systems.

 

NI at EuMW: At NIWeek 2017, we announced LabVIEW NXG 1.0, the next generation of LabVIEW systems engineering software. LabVIEW NXG accelerates automated test system development and deployment with these essential features: guided, instrument-specific examples; test and function reuse; engineering data exploration; ability to build scalable libraries; and remote result viewing.

 

Follow along

 

Follow @NIglobal for updates during the show.

 

Going to EuMW?

 

We look forward to seeing you! Visit us at Stand 124 and in the MicroApps Theatre.

 

Follow us to receive our EuMW updates: @NIglobal

 

 

 

 

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Making data acquisition as simple as 1-2-3 

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Are your tools right for the job?

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It’s time you demand more from DAQ software.

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Learn Faster, Validate Skills, and Accelerate Development

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  • Software
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Why do we prioritize customer proficiency? Because customer success is our success. 

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  • Software
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How can you know what you don’t know?

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This year, we’ve created a series of new technical sessions focused on Design and Architecture and Software Engineering by partnering with several subject matter experts and leveraging LabVIEW Champions in many fields and industries.

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Every student. Every lab. Every researcher.

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We’re already hard at work on the next release

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Looking for all things LabVIEW at NIWeek? Here's a handy list of events and activities.

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We’re excited to announce LabVIEW NXG 1.0, which introduces an efficient, non-programming workflow to LabVIEW - letting you spend more time on innovation than implementation!

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LabVIEW 2017 debuts some new capabilities designed to drastically simplify the development, deployment, and management of distributed systems. We're continuing to streamline complex system design with an open, software-centric platform.

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We make OSS development a priority

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How secure do you feel that the tools you’re using will meet your needs in the future?

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An inside look at working on the largest-of-its-kind wireless testbed designed for DARPA and military applications

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Python’s popularity as a programming language continues to rise, and the test and measurement community has begun to debate when to use LabVIEW and when to use Python.

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Big changes are on the horizon for LabVIEW!

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In a recent post in Electronic Design News (EDN), Michael Dunn discusses the undisciplined use of the term “software engineer” and the prevalence of shoddy code in the world. In his closing argument he states:

 

“I'd like to think that if actual engineers were involved in more projects, we wouldn't live in a world where it's a given that most websites, applications, apps, and embedded systems are poorly designed, overly buggy, and insecure. And though one would like to imagine that all safety-critical systems, at least, are created under the aegis of engineers and engineering principles, I have my doubts.”

 

We agree.

 

This is one of the reasons we exist. We supply an integrated software-based platform that enables engineers to do exactly what Mr. Dunn states. Our choice in this endeavor isn’t to explore a path where engineers needed to become software developers. Instead, our mission is to create an engineering system design tool that empowers engineers to build world-class, complex, mission-critical, software based systems.

 

LabVIEW is at the core of our engineering platform, and when coupled with our modular hardware platforms, becomes a gateway to innovation that engineers the world over are using to make products safer, get to market faster, and accomplish amazing things.

 

LabVIEW simplifies the development of complex engineering applications. It’s native graphical language uses a concept called dataflow to define the parameters of execution and combines its native language with an open interface that integrates code from other software approaches. With this, we ensure that engineers can choose the approach they’re most familiar with for any individual component of the application.

 

We’ve invested 30 years into LabVIEW, making it one of the most productive tools on the planet. And we’re excited to share that the best is yet to come.

 

Stay tuned for more details in mid-2017.

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The NI software portfolio vs a traditional OS

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Software defined radio for mmWave spectrum

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  • Software