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Re: LabVIEW Community Edition

Active Participant

Eric Reffett announces LabVIEW Community Edition at GDevCon#2 in Birmingham, UK.Eric Reffett announces LabVIEW Community Edition at GDevCon#2 in Birmingham, UK.This surprise was definitely not expected by anybody in the audience of GDevCon#2: NI announced LabVIEW Community Edition! This new, free version of LabVIEW is for noncommercial, nonacademic use.

 

Eric Reffett, the LabVIEW and LabVIEW NXG planning lead, literally went the extra mile(s) by traveling to the UK to announce the new NI product offering and answer questions.

 

As part of its commitment to empowering the LabVIEW community, NI revealed this huge news at a community event instead of an NI conference. As a board member of GDevCon Limited, I was excited that NI chose GDevCon#2, an independent conference open to all graphical developers, to unveil its LabVIEW Community Edition.

 

 

What exactly is this new edition?

 

LabVIEW Community Edition features all the functionality of LabVIEW Professional Edition, including the ability to help you build and deploy executables. Most importantly, it is completely free and does not have any watermarks on it. In a nutshell:

 

  • All the features of LabVIEW Professional Edition for free; no watermarks
  • Compatibility with both LabVIEW 2020 and LabVIEW NXG
  • Noncommercial and nonacademic usage
  • Annual activation to maintain access
  • A release date of May 2020 (a beta will be available in November 2019)

 

Is it free, as in beer?

 

Yes, but you must use it only for noncommercial and nonacademic projects. According to the NI End User License Agreement (EULA), “If you have acquired a license to LabVIEW Community Edition or LabVIEW NXG Community Edition, you may use the Software solely for your personal, noncommercial, nonindustrial purposes. You may not use the Software for teaching or research at a degree-granting educational institution.”

 

Using LabVIEW Community Edition at a place of business or to create test systems, exe's, toolkits, and so on that you intend to make money from would not be consistent with the permissions of the EULA. Similarly, students, educators, and researchers would break the EULA if they used LabVIEW Community Edition to work on coursework or research for an academic institution.

 

Users must purchase a license for commercial and academic use cases. LabVIEW Community Edition’s licensing policies are the same as NI‘s current licensing policies.

 

Who’s it for?

Beaglebone_Black.jpg

Arduino_Uno_-_R3.jpg

 

LabVIEW Community Edition is for anybody not pursuing commercial goals but wanting to get creative using a graphical programming language.

 

For example, you can work on a private project on your PC at home and then take it to work to commercialise it using your commercially licensed copy of LabVIEW. Potential use cases include:

 

  • Home hobbyist projects
  • Free projects or add-ons for the community
  • Preparation work for certifications
  • Skill upkeep; exploration of new ideas outside work

LabVIEW Community Edition also allows students and academics to install and use LabVIEW in situations that their academic site licenses don’t cover. They can install it on their PCs and use it at home.

 

What about hobbyist hardware?

 

To ensure this edition of LabVIEW works well for hobbyists, NI updated the LINX Toolkit for supporting hobbyist hardware targets like BeagleBone, Raspberry Pi, and Arduino and bundled it with LabVIEW Community Edition. The toolkit is part of the community edition‘s platform release.

 

More importantly, the no-commercial-projects limitation for the LINX toolkit has been removed, so you can tinker around with your hobby projects using LabVIEW Community Edition at home and then take your work to the office to industrialize and commercialize your hobby projects with a commercially licensed version of LabVIEW. 

 

 

When will it be available?

 

NI will release a beta version of LabVIEW Community Edition in November of this year, at the same time as LabVIEW 2019 SP1, through the Technology Preview Program (all normal disclaimers regarding software timelines apply). NI’s first full release of LabVIEW Community Edition is scheduled for May 2020.

 

A beta version of the LINX Toolkit is available now on the Tech Preview, but the first full release is also scheduled for May 2020. You can learn more by viewing NI’s Software Technology Preview website.

 

In case you’re wondering, though the Technology Preview Program requests a valid SN with an active SSP contract, this is not required for the LabVIEW Community Edition Beta.

 

Edit November 13: The Beta of LabVIEW Community Edition is now available at ni.com/beta!

 

What does this mean for the LabVIEW Community?

 

Saying that I’m excited about this doesn’t do my emotional state any justice at all. I’m thrilled! I do believe that NI’s bold step might finally give LabVIEW the chance it deserves to grow its user base on a really large scale.

 

It’s obvious that giving software away for free lowers the entry barrier for those tinkerers, students, and hobbyists who are already in love with LabVIEW but who do not already own an appropriate license for it.

 

The LabVIEW ecosystem will benefit greatly from this strategic move—probably way more than from anything else ever done in that regard. The effects that I hope this will have on growing the community go way beyond the obvious increase in LabVIEW users. Growing the user base will make the community a better place for all of us. We will see more tools, not only from NI and the LabVIEW community but also from third parties who will take greater interest in our expanding graphical programming world. Eventually, we might see all sorts of tools pop up supporting LabVIEW and the G language—tools that other, text-based languages have been leveraging for years.

 

As an entrepreneur, I expect to benefit from the growing number of potential customers. But even more, I hope to see more people use LabVIEW—or at least be fairly familiar with it—which eventually enlarges our pool of potential employees. How great is that?

 

Feedback

 

Finally, take a few minutes and let NI know how you will leverage LabVIEW Community Edition by taking this short poll:  http://bit.ly/LabVIEWCommunityPoll


An opportunity to learn from experienced developers / entrepreneurs (Fab, Steve and Brian amongst them):
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Comments
Member

Any chance this could be available for out IoT Hackday October 26th?
http://iothackday2019.devpost.com/

I build web apps for LabVIEW
http://chrislarson.me
Member

Hi Chris,

 

Glad to hear you're excited about the LabVIEW Community Edition! Our R&D teams are working hard to get it released as fast as possible, but it won't be quite ready by then Smiley Wink. A few weeks afterwards we'll have the LabVIEW Community Edition Beta available and then the release in May 2020. 

Daniel Parrott
Software Product Marketing - Data Management & LabVIEW
National Instruments
Member

Hi Daniel,

 

Would the new LINX support more boards (newer) in addition to the existing ones?

 

Thanks,

 

Dahai

Member

Hi Dahai,

 

Thanks for the question! For the initial release the new LabVIEW LINX Toolkit will not add support for new boards. In the future newer board support will be considered based on user feedback. 

Daniel Parrott
Software Product Marketing - Data Management & LabVIEW
National Instruments
Member

I was surprised by the great news.
I use Raspberry Pi 3B with LINX. Will I be able to use Raspberry Pi 3B + and Raspberry Pi 4?

 

Thank you

 

Koi Ohashi

Member

Dude, you announce a product on september, 18th  2019 and declare it available on May 2020?!?!?! 

Awesome marketing!

Member

It would be nicer if this LabVIEW edition can bring the Lego mindstorms module back. Why was it phased out at the first place?

 

Dahai

Member

My only question is, why did it take  you so long to do this? I thought "LabVIEW everywhere" was your aim, but that was 15 years ago...

Active Participant

The Beta of LabVIEW Community Edition is now available at ni.com/beta!


An opportunity to learn from experienced developers / entrepreneurs (Fab, Steve and Brian amongst them):
DSH Pragmatic Software Development Workshops
Automate the analyzing, testing, documenting, building, packaging and publishing of your projects via CI/CD:
Release Automation Tools for LabVIEW

Trusted Enthusiast

I’ve applied but also noted that it is not available in the drop down control. Does that mean it’s not available just yet

Regards
Ray Farmer
Active Participant

Bildschirmfoto 2019-11-14 um 16.34.05 (2).png

I'm seeing the element in the dropdown, but maybe that has to do with my current registration for the Technology Preview program? Perhaps someone from NI can check/elaborate?


An opportunity to learn from experienced developers / entrepreneurs (Fab, Steve and Brian amongst them):
DSH Pragmatic Software Development Workshops
Automate the analyzing, testing, documenting, building, packaging and publishing of your projects via CI/CD:
Release Automation Tools for LabVIEW

Member

This is such great news!
The LabVIEW LINX has sort of died out the last years, but this will certainly put it back on track again!
Only thing missing now is the abillty to create simple executables that dont need the runtime engine 🙂 !

________________________________________________
"Science is about knowing, while engineering is about doing"
Member

@Daniel.Parrott wrote:

"Thanks for the question! For the initial release the new LabVIEW LINX Toolkit will not add support for new boards. In the future newer board support will be considered based on user feedback"


Hi Daniel,

 

Member

So Daniel,
Since this is a community edition aimed for "anybody not pursuing commercial goals but wanting to get creative using a graphical programming language", then there should be an option to create simple executables ("hello world") that don't need RTE, by adding the neccessary .DLL-files. with the build. 
If i'm not totaly mistaken, this was possible in earlier version of LabVIEW 🤔

________________________________________________
"Science is about knowing, while engineering is about doing"
Member

Hi S.Stock,

 

You have a great memory! Up until around LabVIEW 5.0 you could build a LabVIEW exe that included the run-time engine within it, so you had a single exe file that contained everything you needed.This may be what you're referencing.

 

This is some great feedback which I passed on to our developers. If you haven't already, you should join the LabVIEW Community edition beta (http://www.ni.com/support/beta-program/). We'd love to hear more from you!

Daniel Parrott
Software Product Marketing - Data Management & LabVIEW
National Instruments
Member

Would LINX 2020 be usable with newer version of LabVIEW (2014+) and Rasp Pi 4?

Member

I'd like to make a suggestion:

 

Consider eventually also making available an (also free) "Core" edition of LabVIEW coupled with a much-reduced-in-size "LabVIEW Core Runtime", with everything hardware- and advanced-math-related removed, but allowing for commercial and academic usage.

 

There would be many benefits in doing so:

 

  1. It'd would allow LabVIEW to develop more into general purpose language, suitable for developing generic cross-platform desktop and web applications;
  2. It'd bring all manners of new developers from outside the very specialized field of industrial applications;
  3. These non-industrially-focused developer would develop new libraries and open source packages that'd expand LabVIEW's capabilities in all manners of directions;
  4. And then all these elements -- 3rd party "for core" tools, new developers, new ideas -- would provide a boost to the industrial-related versions, which would become the natural upgrade paths.

Doing this might risk losing a few sales of paid-for versions, and it'd also incur in costs as NI would have to decouple many things, which would require lots of engineering hours to do. But I believe long term it'd boost LabVIEW's usage in significant ways, and result into even more sales down the line.

 

Typical usage progressions would become something like this:

 

  • Core → Community → Base → Full → Pro → Pro + add-ons → Suite(s)
  • Core → Core + (new, paid for) Advanced Math and similar core-focused add-ons → etc.
  • Core for entry level generic programming classes → Academic licenses for classes focused on industrial applications → Academic licenses for actual research

And so on and so forth.

 

Please consider it, okay? 🙂

 

PS.: I'll post this in the idea exchange too.

 

EDIT: Idea exchange version.

Member

SHARE LABVIEW COMMUNITY WITHOUT LIMITATIONS.


I have been hoping for this for 27 years! 


Can I get a accepted for beta so I can get a feel & familiar with LabVIEW Community Edition? Please don’t make me wait until May or so.

I hope it’s available for MacOS X, WINDOWS & LINUX AS FAR BACK AS YOU CAN REASONABLY GO. 

I bought LabVIEW (1) IN 1987-88 & got a free upgrade to LabVIEW 2 for the Mac I. Worked with LabVIEW thru 5 or 6 until 1993. 
Tinkered with LV 2013-2014 & really wanna take advantage of LabVIEW Community.

 

בובי
Proven Zealot

@fuzwuz https://ni.com/beta to apply. I don't know if they're still approving new applications since we are so late in the cycle. You may have to wait for May... 2.5 months after 27 years should be doable, yes?

 

32-bit Windows only for this first release with hope to expand in the future.

 

Side note: JeffK says he's happy that we are finally able to check off your LV 1.0 feature request.

Member

Hi I am a freelance programmer and STEM tutor.  I had been using Labview for many years since I was a graduate student.  During the time, I developed a system to perform a series of low temperature measurement with a cryostat.  I am glad that now I can use Labview again.  Labview was an useful and powerful tool in my school life.

As a STEM tutor, I am wondering if the free license also covers kids education.  In the article, it states that it is not free for academic usage, but it also says that "You may not use the Software for teaching or research at a degree-granting educational institution.”  Does it mean the license is not free only for tertiary education?  Not include elementry and high schools?  If this edition can be used in elementry, high schools or even private education center, I can help to promote Labview to the kids.  I will post teaching article to my STEM website too.  "I also hope to see more people use LabVIEW—or at least be fairly familiar with it."

Member

Does this version(lvrt20-schroot) support Python Node?

Proven Zealot

> Does this version(lvrt20-schroot) support Python Node?

 

Yes. LV Community Edition is everything that is in the Pro edition of LabVIEW plus the LINX toolkit.

Member

When will the linux version be released?

Member

Hi JayPro,

 

We are working hard to get the LabVIEW for Linux Community Edition released. We'll be sure to let everyone know when we get a better picture of when that will be! 

Daniel Parrott
Software Product Marketing - Data Management & LabVIEW
National Instruments
Member

Hi. Just noticed the statement “This site will be deprecated on August 1, 2020” in the LabVIEW Makerhub site. At the same time the site seems quite "dead" and not possible to post on forum etc. 

Could you please let us know the plans regarding the LINX development and will the Makerhub site be taken down?

 

Thanks

Knight of NI

I think, at least the forum part, is being migrated to here: https://forums.ni.com/t5/LINX/bd-p/linx-toolkit.


GCentral
There are only two ways to tell somebody thanks: Kudos and Marked Solutions
Unofficial Forum Rules and Guidelines
Member

Hi @sakko and @crossrulz,

 

The labviewmakerhub.com site is not being maintained, so we'll be migrating it over to ni.com and redirecting the content to things that are more up-to-date. @crossrulz is absolutely right -- https://forums.ni.com/t5/LINX/bd-p/linx-toolkit is the correct place to go for forums activity related to the LINX Toolkit. 

 

Thanks,

Mackenzie

Member

@Daniel.Parrott  "We are working hard to get the LabVIEW for Linux Community Edition released."

 

This is very good news. I'm really worry about future of Linux support because of .net based NXG.

 

@ "Yes. LV Community Edition is everything that is in the Pro edition of LabVIEW plus the LINX toolkit."

 

Does it means that Python Node is supported in LINX (when Raspberry PI is selected as target device) ?

 

 

Do you have any timeline when LINX will became compatible with Raspberry Pi OS (64 bit).

https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=275370

ARM64 target may allow to use LINX not only on Raspberry PI but also on very popular Jetson Nano.

Member

Hi! How to use LabVIEW Community Edition on a computer that doesn't connect to the Internet? It expires after 7 days and no identity-based activation is possible.