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The LabWindows/CVI R&D team is committed to reviewing every idea submitted via the LabWindows/CVI Idea Exchange. However, we cannot guarantee the implementation of any LabWindows/CVI Idea Exchange submission.

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At the moment the maximum panel and control name length is limitted to 32, if you set them programmatically.

 

Because of longer customer system signal names it is not possible to use them directly as control names. If the maximum length could be raised to 64 or to the maximum label length, it would help to avoid to generate new control names and the additional mapping between costumer system signal names and the generated control names in the test environment.

OPC UA has become much more popular in the last few years.

I did some tests trying to integrate open62541 library in CVI 2015 and 2017.

 

I think that CVI should provide this library as an add-on.

Moreover NI engineers can put their effort tryingo to develop the library itself (rather than rewriting a library from scratch).

At present the IniFile instrument permits to read an existing .INI file, modify it and re-save it preserving existing comments in the file, if any. It would be a great addition to permit to programmatically add comments to sections and/or items.

 

I have a rather complex application with several optional modules that can be added or tailored by setting appropriate items in a configuration file in .INI format. I have developed an application that helps me creating such configuration files with the proper elements added but if I want to add some comment for better documentation to the final user I need to manually add them after the file has been created with the risk of forgetting something: if I could add them while generating the configuration file I would avoid this risks.

The CVI Full Development System supports Microsoft's Software Development Kit.

I'd like to suggest to update this support to Windows 10 SDK.

Network Variables currently provide support for OPC DA. However, the industry has been moving from OPC DA to OPC UA (Unified Architecture). The reasons for this are many, but mainly based on security and ease of use. Surveys over the last couple of years show that there are now more devices and applications being produced with OPC UA support than DA support. I have enquired whether NI are planning to support UA technology, but it seems that this is not in the pipe line.

 

There are solutions available (open62541, for example) that may provide a solution. Does anyone have any experience with using this solution with CVI?

 

I am looki

LabWindows/CVI lags behind the more recent developments in its programming language, C. At present, it only partially supports the C99 standard, not to mention the improved Unicode support of the current standard, C11.

Since odds are that Unicode finally will be supported in a future version of LabWindows/CVI, this might be a good opportunity to also ask for support of the current standard of CVI's programming language, C11, allowing the use of UTF encoded strings and also including updated libraries (e.g., supporting complex or long long) and debugging tools (data tooltips and variable view supporting complex numbers, for example). It also would help to improve C/C++ compatibility for programs that use complex floating-point values.

 

I really would appreciate it if the LabWindows/CVI project will show some strong signs of development and accompany us for the next 30 years, too.

This X just closes out of the tab that is on top.

 

CVI window.PNG

 

Pretty much every other program with tabs has the X on the tab you’re closing out of. The current placement makes me hesitate every time, because it feels like you’re X-ing out of the entire code-viewing pane, not just the single file you want to close.

 

It’s also not consistent with the rest of the environment.

For example, in the pane on the bottom in the screenshot above, “Threads” and “Wa tch” look like two tabs, but clicking the X in that pane causes the entire pane to disappear rather than just closing the tab that is on top.

The integration of some SCC software is officially supported in CVI (see this KB).

Unfortunately GIT is not officially supported, but its popularity has been increasing very much.

LabVIEW has a specific User Group in the community (Git User Group) and I think CVI should support the same integration

 

Code refactoring is a common need for C developers and availability of eiter automated or semi-automated tools can be really helpful.

Since LabWindows/CVI now uses llvm+clang, probably a tool like "include-what-you-use" can be integrated.

This is the github page for the tool.

 

From the documentation:

"Include what you use" means this: for every symbol (type, function variable, or macro) that you use in foo.cc, either foo.cc or foo.h should #include a .h file that exports the declaration of that symbol. The include-what-you-use tool is a program that can be built with the clang libraries in order to analyze #includes of source files to find include-what-you-use violations, and suggest fixes for them.

The main goal of include-what-you-use is to remove superfluous #includes. It does this both by figuring out what #includes are not actually needed for this file (for both .cc and .h files), and replacing #includes with forward-declares when possible.

 

Here you can find this topic discussed in LabWindows/CVI forum.

It appears that cvi.exe can run into serious memory problems for larger projects due to a memory-hungry generation of source code browse information.

The solutions suggested (* don't generate browse information for larger projects or * don't use larger projects) are not too helpful. In my opinion, a much better solution would be to provide cvi.exe as a 64 bit application.

Because a crashing CVI is a serious limitation I hope this wish will make it soon.

Thanks...

The idea and the code has been originally posted by @nickb here.

This library handles a common need that I handled in a less elegant way as described here.

 

As suggested by @RobertoBozzolo the original code from Nick would be a great addition to the Programmer's Toolbox.

In this way all the users would benefit froma standard tool, without re-inventing the wheel (as I did) Smiley Wink

I recognized it's not possible any more to view a constant while debugging since CVI 2015.

Example: #define CONSTANT1      1

For example if I have a constant defined, I can then right click “view variable value”.

Normally CVI then shows me the value.

 

Since CVI 2015 this doesn’t work anymore. I also tried with CVI 2017.

In our code we use many structs where the fields are defined by a constant.

Now when the debugger can’t view the constant any more it also won’t view the value of the struct.

Example: #define CONSTANT1      1

Int struct[10];

struct[CONSTANT1]  = 5;

 

This is the main reason why I didn't upgrade from CVI 2010 to 2015.

As discussed here, distributing the code of

 

#include <ansi_c.h>
int main ( int argc, char *argv [] )

{
    printf ( "%s", "Hello world" );

 

generated in CVI2013 results in a distribution kit of 74 MB minimum...  Using the NI default settings results in 219 MB...

 

Yes, I do have TB drives, but I dislike bloated software.

Hello,

watch expressions support the possibility to monitor changes of variables by placing the variable in the watch window. Unfortunately, at present it seems impossible to put a 2 D variable in the watch window, e.g., x_data [  2  ] [  3  ].

The new idea is to allow this Smiley Happy

Thanks!

At present CVI is missing a serious report printing facility that permits to create flexible, professional and good looking reports.

A quick search in CVI forum shows that periodically somebody posts questions about reporting but available instruments at the moment are not satisfactory in my experience.

 

As far as I can tell, a good reporting instrument:

 

  1. Should integrate easily with CVI
  2. Should be fully documented, with some example for the more typical types of reports (text + table, text + graph, text + image...)
  3. Should not rely on external programs (some customers have rigid constraints on the software installed on equipment machines; additionally, asking them to have full Word or Excel or Diadem installed only for reporting is just not serious)
  4. Should not rely on ActiveX controls to be licensed separately (same as above)
  5. Should permit to include text and graphics (images, graphs...) and define headers, footers, page numbering and other common features normally present in reports
  6. Should output data directly to the printer or in PDF format
  7. Should have a preview facility both for development and for the user (something that NIReports hasn't and will never have)

Hello,

 

I've used the serial port call back for many years, and it works great.

 

The XNET driver would benefit greatly for at least a receive call back function, and possible even a transmit call back function.

 

This would make communication with automotive ECUs easier to implement.

 

Regards,

 

Terry Moss

Robert Bosch

Charleston South Carolina

Hi,

 

there has been the valuable suggestion of a "Picture and Text" button allowing more modern buttons.

 

For all those focusing on programming instead of UI design it would be also nice if CVI could provide more default buttons ready to use as some examples shown in the image below (taken from the NI community).

 

As they seem to be already available in LabVIEW it shouldn't be much effort for NI to adapt them to CVI... - hopefully Smiley Wink

 

 

buttons.jpg 

Hello,

 

because I had installed CVI2010 on a brand new Windows 7 machine, I was curios to find out about all the service processes running on the system.

It seems that there are quite a few NI services that start after log-on. Some of  them seem superfluous, such as the Lookout Citadel service (no LabVIEW, no Lookout installed), but due to the lack of any information I did not bother trying to stop them

 

Suggestions:

1) NI should critically review the services and only start the services that are absolutely needed.

2) Services that are optional might be selected by a checkbox during installation or from the Options / Environment setting

3) NI should provide some documentation / explanation of each service and why it is needed.

 

Thanks!

NI is not a C/C++ Editor-Debugger company.  And, it will never be able to invest the man power needed to get there.  NIs strengths are its Instrument UIs, its libraries, and it's visual application UI pieces.  The LabWindows/CVI tool looks and feels like tools from the mid 90's (ie.  like an old Borland C editor, but even less featured).  It lacks the toolset found in VisualStudios, NetBeans, and Eclipse.  And, it will always be behind.

 

The Verigy93k tester was like this several years ago.  They wrote their own C/C++ editor, and it was at a mid 80's level.  When a team was asked to rewrite the UI and bring it up to date, they made a novel choice (they recognized that they were not a UI platform / editor company), and they moved their product under Eclipse.  Teradyne Flex did something similar a year or two later moving under Excel and Visual Studio.  The thing is this, both companies realized that they could make more money focusing on their real strength.  They added libraries and apis to work in the platforms framework, and changed/adapted the platform framework to work for them.  ie. Teradynes Flex test tool does not say "Excel/Visual Studio", it says it is a Teradyne product based on MS Excel and VS.  And, they have adapted the platform to their needs adding on the extra Windows/UIs/... to meet their needs.  Same with the Verigy 93K.

 

In Teradynes case, they went back to the drawing board.  So, we will ignore this (even with their success).  In Verigys case, all their existing APIs worked in the new platform, and the user didn't need to change anything when they upgraded.  But, suddenly the Editor and Debugger were up to date, with latest greatest features.  It was a huge change overnight.

 

LabWindows really should make a shift to Eclipse.  Keep your old legacy stuff at first, but working under Eclipse.  Add in "Views" and "Tools" to supplement what Eclipse doesn't give you for free.  And, remove unwanted or confusing plugins from the eclipse base.  (This is what advantest did.)  Leave in features that make Eclipse great, like error view, and the ability to have several "perspectives".  And really focus the man power into making a product that will blow the others out of the water.  NI has what it takes to make great Instrument editing/debugging windows in Eclipse.  But, NI doesn't have the 1,000's of people and millions of man hours required to make an Editor/Debugger that will compare to the Eclipses/VisualStudios of the world.  As a business they should focus on what will make them a differentiator, and reuse what is accepted and common.

 

Anyway.  My 2 cents on how you could really improve LabWindows in a few short months.  (Note: Verigy spent all of 9 months and 9 engineers on their C/C++ integration into eclipse...  I know... I was there at the time.)  If you took the LabWindows team, and a year or two...  Imagine how much better of a job you could do.

Allow you to select multiple lines and then go to Edit>>Block Comment/Uncomment to be able to comment or uncomment multiple sections of code at once.