LabVIEW

cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

tortoiseSVN

Solved!
Go to solution

I have installed TortoiseSVN for software version control.  I have checked my project file into the SCC directory, but don't understand how to check them out.  Do I need to check out every file in the project?

 

Thanks for the help.




metzler CLAD
0 Kudos
Message 1 of 22
(494 Views)
Solution
Accepted by metzler

@metzler wrote:

I have installed TortoiseSVN for software version control.  I have checked my project file into the SCC directory, but don't understand how to check them out.  Do I need to check out every file in the project?


If you have a repo, you won't be checking in\out files. You'd add them, commit them, or revert them.

 

If you made a repo, copy the files in the (checked out) folder. If you created the repo from the folder, the repo is already there, and you won't need to check out. If someone else made the repo, check out the repo to a folder.

 

Once the files are added to the folder (not the repo!), you need to add them to the repo. Either do an add action, or simply commit the entire folder (right click it and 'commit') and then add all the files. Files that have not been added will not be marked by default, so click the 'all' tag to add and commit in one action.

0 Kudos
Message 2 of 22
(429 Views)

wiebe@CARYA wrote:

@metzler wrote:

I have installed TortoiseSVN for software version control.  I have checked my project file into the SCC directory, but don't understand how to check them out.  Do I need to check out every file in the project?


If you have a repo, you won't be checking in\out files. You'd add them, commit them, or revert them.

 

If you made a repo, copy the files in the (checked out) folder. If you created the repo from the folder, the repo is already there, and you won't need to check out. If someone else made the repo, check out the repo to a folder.

 

Once the files are added to the folder (not the repo!), you need to add them to the repo. Either do an add action, or simply commit the entire folder (right click it and 'commit') and then add all the files. Files that have not been added will not be marked by default, so click the 'all' tag to add and commit in one action.


I would recommend that you do a few other things when using source code control. First, set "Separate compiled code from source" as you default foe LabVIEW as well as any projects you create. If you don't do this you will get lots of churn in your repository simply because a VI was recompiled due to a subVI or typedef being modified. Also, I will always ignore the .alias and .lvpls files. Those are auto-generated by LabVIEW and are constantly changing. There is no need for these to be under source code control.



Mark Yedinak
Certified LabVIEW Architect
LabVIEW Champion

"Does anyone know where the love of God goes when the waves turn the minutes to hours?"
Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald - Gordon Lightfoot
Message 3 of 22
(412 Views)

If you are several people working on the same code, you can check out files to flag them as 'occupied'. In Explorer (or repo explorer) you just r-click the files or a folder and Check out. 

/Y

G# - Award winning reference based OOP for LV, for free! ADDQ VIPM Now on GitHub
"Only dead fish swim downstream" - "My life for Kudos!" - "Dumb people repeat old mistakes - smart ones create new ones."
Certified-LabVIEW-Developer
0 Kudos
Message 4 of 22
(409 Views)

@Yamaeda wrote:

If you are several people working on the same code, you can check out files to flag them as 'occupied'. In Explorer (or repo explorer) you just r-click the files or a folder and Check out. 

/Y


I don't see that when I check files out.  I think you can manually tell TSVN to lock files and folders, and I think you can also change the checkout behavior in the settings, but I believe the default settings are not to mark files as "in use".

Bill
CLD
(Mid-Level minion.)
My support system ensures that I don't look totally incompetent.
Proud to say that I've progressed beyond knowing just enough to be dangerous. I now know enough to know that I have no clue about anything at all.
Humble author of the CLAD Nugget.
0 Kudos
Message 5 of 22
(392 Views)
Highlighted

You should "check out" this great tutorial from Delacor:

 

Message 6 of 22
(380 Views)

@Gregory wrote:

You should "check out" this great tutorial from Delacor:

 


Seems that you're very "committed" to this topic.

Bill
CLD
(Mid-Level minion.)
My support system ensures that I don't look totally incompetent.
Proud to say that I've progressed beyond knowing just enough to be dangerous. I now know enough to know that I have no clue about anything at all.
Humble author of the CLAD Nugget.
Message 7 of 22
(350 Views)

Yes 🙂 Though we may never resolve our conflicts and agree on which tool is best, I think we can all agree that using some version control tool is better than using nothing!

Message 8 of 22
(336 Views)

@Gregory wrote:

Yes 🙂 Though we may never resolve our conflicts and agree on which tool is best, I think we can all agree that using some version control tool is better than using nothing!


The tools seems to be growing towards each other.

 

I can (and sometimes do) use TSVN to commit to GIT, and IIRC tools like sourcetree let you use any repo.

0 Kudos
Message 9 of 22
(288 Views)

I am the lone programmer, using one computer.  

I created a repository using the folder that the files were created in.  

It seems that I cannot check them out, so do I just change the files in the repository or make a working copy of the files in another folder, change those, and then add and commit them to the repo?

If so, do I then delete the working copy?




metzler CLAD
0 Kudos
Message 10 of 22
(273 Views)