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more information about LabVIEW

Hi , 

i want your help . i want to improve my LabVIEW Knowledge . so ,if there any books , articles ,websites could help me for my mission .

Best Regard .

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Message 1 of 6
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Hi Emna.

 

did you notice the "Training resources" section in the header of the LabVIEW board?

Best regards,
GerdW
CLAD expired, using LV2011SP1 + LV2017 (+LV2019 sometimes) on Win7+cRIO
Kudos are welcome Smiley Wink

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Hi Emna,

 

Like GerdW said, the top of the forum has a few links to available training materials.

 

If you have access to the "Online Training" (with the SSP) then I'd suggest starting there.

Core 1 and Core 2 contain lots of useful information to get started with, and after that you will be better informed to choose more advanced topics from that site.

 

NI also has badges available now for various sets of topics - some of these have associated learning material and studying towards those can give a nice incentive and milestones for progress. You can also put the badges on e.g. LinkedIn. A link is here: https://learn.ni.com/badges


GCentral
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Both of these books are a decade old, but are still my standard references.  "LabVIEW for Everyone", Travers and Kring, will tell more more than you want to know about the ins and outs of LabVIEW.  If you want to develop good, stable, well-documented LabVIEW code, get "The LabVIEW Style Book" by Peter Blume, which is less concerned with teaching you the "How" of LabVIEW coding than with showing you the importance of "Style", neat Block Diagrams, the use of sub-VIs, the importance of design and documentation, and what I call being more concerned with what you want to do than with how you want to do it.  Here's a sample Style guideline -- Every Block Diagram Should Fit on a Single Laptop Screen (my paraphrase).  I'm pleased to say that >95% of mine follow this guideline.

 

Bob Schor

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@Bob_Schor wrote:

Every Block Diagram Should Fit on a Single Laptop Screen (my paraphrase).  I'm pleased to say that >95% of mine follow this guideline.


With more laptops sporting 4K screens (i hate that nomenclature, it's 2160p or 8MP) i'd say it's better expressed as "a VI should generally be less than 15 blocks" or similar.

/Y

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I believe the Style Book expressed it in Pixels (but I don't remember if it was 1024 x 768 or something larger -- I generally am willing to accept 1280 x 1024, or even 1920 x 1080, but generally "Small is Beautiful").

 

Bob Schor

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