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how do I distribute an executable from Labview 8.6

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That won't work - at least without a lot of extra work, imho. Some files require installation in specific folders, sometimes the windows registry must be updated, and windows services installed and started. You would also need to run a dependency checker to list the dozens and dozens of linked dlls. Do it the simple way and create a single installer.
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Message 11 of 22
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Ben321 wrote:
I need to know because I want to do it the simple way. Find ALL the runtime files for Labview then put'm in a zip file and be done with it. Then once I put the EXE file I've compiled on another computer,  I just unzip the complete runtime files out of that ZIP file and put them in the same directory as the EXE file. This would mean NEVER having to hassle with configuring an installer, which sounds like a complete waste of time. "Unzip and go. NEVER install." is my motto.

In my opinion this sound like MUCH MORE hassle than creating an installer. And well, yeah... :smileyindifferent:  Huh, a complete waste of time Besides finding all the files needed for example with this tool http://www.dependencywalker.com/ You must also find all keys needed in the registry file. Why not just walk trough the door 😉

 

 

Message Edited by Coq rouge on 05-23-2009 10:24 AM


Besides which, my opinion is that Express VIs Carthage must be destroyed deleted
(Sorry no Labview "brag list" so far)
Message 12 of 22
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If you really want to go that way, maybe thinapp is the thing for you http://www.vmware.com/products/thinapp/using.html

 



Besides which, my opinion is that Express VIs Carthage must be destroyed deleted
(Sorry no Labview "brag list" so far)
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Message 13 of 22
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I made a fairly simple program, I should be able to just put the Labview 8.6 Runtime files in my application's directory and be done with it. Why would registry entries be needed if all the program's files are in its own directory rather than somewhere else on the harddrive?

 

 

Well I guess that's a mut point now because I went ahead and made an installer. The problem is that my installer does NOT install the IMAQ (image aquisition) VIs. But NI IMAQ is used in my program. And with the default settings for the installer, it does NOT install the needed IMAQ files. And even more, I don't know

what settings to leave at default and what settings to change to something else, in order to get the installer to include the needed IMAQ files.

Please help.

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Message 14 of 22
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The problem is that my installer does NOT install the IMAQ (image aquisition) VIs. But NI IMAQ is used in my program. And with the default settings for the installer, it does NOT install the needed IMAQ files. And even more, I don't know

what settings to leave at default and what settings to change to something else, in order to get the installer to include the needed IMAQ files.

Please help.

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Message 15 of 22
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Hi Ben,

 

Under your Installer settings, go to Additional Installers and select NI-IMAQ to have the installer include IMAQ.

Stephen Meserve
National Instruments
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Message 16 of 22
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Thanks! But now here's another question. It turns out that it actaully needed NI-Vision not IMAQ (I'm not camera capturing anything, just image processing). But the problem is that when I put it on my software test computer (It doesn't have any NI products on it so I can test a raw installation of programs I make in Labview), it claims that the license for Vision Runtime 8.6 isn't activated. And that's strange, it isn't a full NI Vision install, just a runtime files install. And Labview runtime files do NOT need activation when used as part of the installation of a program made in Labview. This is rediculous. How can I distribute my app by selling it to people if they'll have to not only pay me for the disk with the program I made but also are going to have to shell out HUNDREDS of dollars for the Vision Runtime 8.6 license? Nobody will buy my product if they have to go through that. They'll want to pay one person once and be done with it.

 

Now my software is ham radio related (sending images over sound so a ham radio mike can send pictures, not just voice, to be exact) and I might want to make a couple dozen copies of it, put it on some CDs and sell it at the next ham radio convention in my area, for maybe $10 per disk. But if people have to go and pay NI hundreds of $ for some stupid runtime files, nobody will buy my product, and it will be a BIG flop. Is there anyway I can somehow get the SAME functionality with NI Vision, without using files that have to be activated?

 

So far the only way I was able to test it on my test computer was to download a keygen I found by searching Google for NI Vision Runtime keygen, then activating it on my test computer with the keygen. But I will NOT distribute the keygen with my software, because that would be ILLEGAL, BIG TIME! Is there a LEGAL way I can somehow get this functionality to hamradio enthusiasts without having to activate these stupid runtime files for every computer that my application will go on?

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Message 17 of 22
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NI Vision Run-Time License  part number 778044-03 price 309$. Sorry but that is your option. But if your product is good I think people will purchase it anyway



Besides which, my opinion is that Express VIs Carthage must be destroyed deleted
(Sorry no Labview "brag list" so far)
Message 18 of 22
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Since you got LabVIEW and NI-Vision for free under some sort of academic license, you better check if you are legally able to distribute any LabVIEW program - vision or not.
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Message 19 of 22
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I suppose it might be ok if I distributed it as a hobby (ham radio in this case) related thing, rather than having industrial or commercial uses. That way I could say it has educational value and is in compliance with my "academic" license as you call it. But I don't believe it is even an academic licesne. I believe the U of W somehow managed to work a business deal with NI to provide for free the best version of Labview available (not student version, but rather Professional Development version, which is definitely not an "academic" license). And the UW gets reimbursed by the tuition payed by all students, and since not that many people use Labview, the tuition everyone pays is more than enough to cover Labview and lots of other software the university provides to students for free.

 

At least I think that's how it works.

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Message 20 of 22
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