LabVIEW

cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Why data memory is not completely wiped out while closing a VI?

I am facing some memory allocation issue in my LabVIEW project. Help me sorting it out. Followed below steps,

 

1. Launching LabVIEW 2011.

2. Checking memory allocation (say it is n kB) 3. Opening my project VI.

4. Again checking memory allocation (say it is n + 10 kB) 5. Closing the VI.

6. Again checking memory allocation.

7. Expected it to be n KB. But it is not. There is some residual memory which is not properly wiped out.

8. Repeated these same steps for NI example VI (C:\Program Files\National Instruments\LabVIEW 2011\examples\control\PID\Autotuning PID Online with Gain

Scheduling.vi) found same results.

 

Explain me why the data memory allocated while opening the VI is not completely wiped out after closing it.

 

We are doing some memeory optimization in our LabVIEW project. So a clear justification is required for this question.

 

Thanks,

Rameshkannan

0 Kudos
Message 1 of 2
(1,654 Views)

@mrk1 wrote:

I am facing some memory allocation issue in my LabVIEW project. Help me sorting it out. Followed below steps,

 

1. Launching LabVIEW 2011.

2. Checking memory allocation (say it is n kB) 3. Opening my project VI.

4. Again checking memory allocation (say it is n + 10 kB) 5. Closing the VI.

6. Again checking memory allocation.

7. Expected it to be n KB. But it is not. There is some residual memory which is not properly wiped out.

8. Repeated these same steps for NI example VI (C:\Program Files\National Instruments\LabVIEW 2011\examples\control\PID\Autotuning PID Online with Gain

Scheduling.vi) found same results.

 

Explain me why the data memory allocated while opening the VI is not completely wiped out after closing it.

 

We are doing some memeory optimization in our LabVIEW project. So a clear justification is required for this question.

 

Thanks,

Rameshkannan


 

 

YOu may be seeing the file alloaction info being cached. LV will try to remeber where it found files so it can find them faster next time.

 

I suspect you should ignore that part and focus on the parts of your code that is suffering from memory abuse.

 

You can use the Profile VIs tools to locate who is gobling up the memory.

Then use "show buffer allocations" to figure out where the issue is.

 

Post image if you want the gang here to "play along".

 

Ben

 

Retired Senior Automation Systems Architect with Data Science Automation LabVIEW Champion Knight of NI and Prepper LinkedIn Profile YouTube Channel
Message 2 of 2
(1,635 Views)