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The most impressive fact of the new Labview 2024 ...

 


@Walker34 wrote:

 

We can write the complete list of its new features on a single post-it note!!!

 

Great.


Another impressive fact is that in Vision Development Module 2024 Q1 (released last month) we have no any new features (at least I didn't found any), so you don't need post-it note at all!

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@Yamaeda wrote:

I don't know if it's in this version or when it changed, but building an .exe is quite a lot faster than in LV2019!


This is very likely from 2023 q3 Building Applications and PPLs Improvements 
https://www.ni.com/docs/en-US/bundle/upgrading-labview/page/labview-2023q3-changes.html

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@avogadro5 wrote: This is very likely from 2023 q3 Building Applications and PPLs Improvements 

https://www.ni.com/docs/en-US/bundle/upgrading-labview/page/labview-2023q3-changes.html


Thanks, it is _quite_ noticable! 30 mins -> 5 for some projects!

G# - Award winning reference based OOP for LV, for free! - Qestit VIPM GitHub

Qestit Systems
Certified-LabVIEW-Developer
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Message 13 of 31
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@Walker34 wrote:


I'm honestly more concerned with fixed bugs than new features. 

When I pay for an annual license, I personally expect improvements. Bug fixes are part of the warranty.


According to NI this is part of that "ongoing dialog" that we have.  This is one of the benefits we were told about when it came to the subscription model.

 

They create an ongoing dialog and relationship between a company and its users. This allows the company to better understand how its products deliver long-term recurring value to its users. When our products are built better, it enables you to do your job better, and you, your company, and your customers all benefit.

and

 

Subscription requires a company to provide recurring value to customers.


 

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Let's just say it's hard not to see this as laziness and opportunism. Under the previous pricing model, it's easy to imagine that no one would have bought LabView 2024. People would have stayed with the previous version, saying to themselves: what's the point, there are no improvements. But now, with the subscription model, you're stuck with it. The subscription model takes the pressure off the supplier to do better.

 

But this is very dangerous for NI in the long run. A development environment should stimulate young engineers. If young people don't choose LabView, then companies won't either, because they won't be able to find people to work with it in the future.

 

I was expecting .NET core support. It was scheduled for late 2023... That's why I'm a little upset.

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@Walker34 wrote:

 

I was expecting .NET core support. It was scheduled for late 2023... That's why I'm a little upset.


That was clearly wishful thinking playing tricks with you. NI never stated when they will implement it. In fact it was always in the second group of time frames. The first group being the next two releases and the second being later than those next two.

You badly wishing for this, interpreted it to mean in the third release, NI trying to decide who to devote to this task clearly understands it rather as “not in the next two releases and God may know if ever”.

Rolf Kalbermatter
My Blog
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@Walker34 wrote:

I was expecting .NET core support. It was scheduled for late 2023... That's why I'm a little upset.


I could really use those promised* dynamic front panel controls...

 

* No real promises where ever made for this too. In fact, NI simply don't make any hard promises ever, which is inconvenient for us, but smart. As a software developer, you never really when something new will be done until it is. I'd like to get ETAs on all new features, but I can relate to their strategy. The 'dynamic' side of business doesn't help.

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@rolfk  a écrit :

@Walker34 wrote:

 

I was expecting .NET core support. It was scheduled for late 2023... That's why I'm a little upset.


That was clearly wishful thinking playing tricks with you. NI never stated when they will implement it.


You're right Rolf.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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wiebe@CARYA wrote:

@Walker34 wrote:

I was expecting .NET core support. It was scheduled for late 2023... That's why I'm a little upset.


I could really use those promised* dynamic front panel controls...


They were in NXG for a brief moment before it got canceled.  I'm not sure where you heard of this feature being worked on but is it possible NI was talking about its inclusion in NXG, and now that NXG is gone they have to start over on the feature implementation?  

 

Unicode is another feature NI put on the roadmap saying the next 1-2 releases.  But then then after two releases the roadmap was updated to say it would be sometime in the future.  I'm not desperate for Unicode but I hear from others that it is pretty important to them.

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@Walker34 wrote:

 

Under the previous pricing model, it's easy to imagine that no one would have bought LabView 2024.


How many people were deciding whether or not to purchase on a version by version basis? That was only cost effective if you only bought a new license every 5 years or so. Otherwise, you'd be better off with a SSP.

 

Your choices have always been really high "new license" costs or some form of recurring payment. It does very much aggravate me that the recurring payment is now much higher and no longer provides perpetual access to the old version you last paid at when it lapses. We are definitely paying more for less.

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