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How to get a smooth plot?

Hello Everyone,

 

I have a set of X and Y axis values and I need to plot them as a smooth curve (like: Attachment- Smooth.png) but I get a rough plot with sharp edges (Attachment - Output.png). Could you help me to get the smooth plot?

 

Thanks for your idea..

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Hi,

 

To have a curve, You will use a method of intepolation.

find it in the palette : Mathematic->Interpolation & Extrapolation. 

 

Best regards,

Fred

 

Kudos are welcomeSmiley Happy

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Hello Fred!

 

Thanks for your reply.

 

I have already tried with "Spline" functions but found nothing as required. If possible, could you please suggest your idea with an example?

 

Thanks,

Karthiga.

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have a look at the examples

"..\National Instruments\LabVIEW 2017\examples\Mathematics\Fitting\B Spline Fitting Demo.vi"

 

fitting.PNG

2019 expired compiling executables with LabView 2017

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Hi  alexderjuengere,

 

I am here to say that the method which has been followed in the example code you suggested, did not work for me. Anyway, thank you for your information!

 

Regards,

Karthiga

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Deciding how to plot data requires thinking about the data and what it might represent.  Your illustration showed only three points.  If those are all the data that you have, and if there is not some assumed underlying "rule" that suggests a relationship between the points, then you may be best in plotting the data just as isolated points (emphasizing you are making no assumptions about what would be expected for other samples at "in-between" points), or possible a bar graph.

 

On the other hand, if you think there is a "rule" (such as Y should be a linear function of X, or Y should be a low-order polynomial of X, or Y represents a periodic function of X, or Y is related logarithmically, or exponentially, or via a power law, to X), then you can indulge in some curve-fitting, and once you have a fitting function, you plot the function (which will probably not pass through the points).  Note that connecting the points with straight lines is equivalent to saying "I don't know anything about what happens between the points, but I'm confident that at these values of X, Y is the "correct" number, so I'll assume that Y varies linearly as a function of X when I'm between two X values".

 

In other words, in the absence of a "model", or some idea how the Y values should look at points where you have no measured data, and in the absence of "uncertainty" measures for the X and Y values you are using, isolated points probably represent your data in the "least-misleading" (what a concept!) way, and "connect the dots" is common enough that most readers will intuitively understand that you are "presenting data without a model".

 

Bob Schor

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@Karthiga wrote:

Hi  alexderjuengere,

 

I am here to say that the method which has been followed in the example code you suggested, did not work for me. Anyway, thank you for your information!

 

Regards,

Karthiga


How about you attach the data-points you want to smooth as a .csv ?

2019 expired compiling executables with LabView 2017

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wait a second,  I once wrote this demo of a Bezier Interpolation between two Data Points (P1,P2) and a third anchor point (Anker),

because the built-in LabView .vi is designed for a different use of Bezier-Interpolation and I wasn't able to modify the built-in to my needs

bezier_snippet2017.png

 

 

 

 

2019 expired compiling executables with LabView 2017

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