LabVIEW

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Device for studying LabView

You can go really cheap, like 10$-20$ if you buy a USB to I2C converter and some I2C chips.

 

Some for SPI (the converter often can do I2C and SPI).

 

Of course an Arduino can do that too, and a lot more. But you'll be programming the Arduino, and won't get the I2C\SPI experience in LabVIEW. 

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A cheap SRD (I think ~40$) could be fun.

 

You can make AM or FM receivers. Even DAB+ probably, if you can find a spec for it. There are programs that use them to receive free to air television. So it might be possible to make that in LabVIEW. Probably not a beginners project.

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Thank you very much to everyone involved in the discussion! I'll figure it out. While stopped at SDR.

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@tap1956 wrote:

Thank you very much to everyone involved in the discussion! I'll figure it out. While stopped at SDR.


Yes, SDR, not SRD...

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wiebe@CARYA wrote:

Of course an Arduino can do that too, and a lot more. But you'll be programming the Arduino, and won't get the I2C\SPI experience in LabVIEW. 


Oh you still can.  LINX allows for loading a set of already written C code that allows the Arduino to interface with LabVIEW pretty well.  It comes with a nice palette of functions already written and I2C and SPI are there.  Among other common Arduino functions.  No need to write Arduino code unless you want to expend the API LINX gives you with more commands.

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> but remember a DAQ device is limited in the voltage range

> it can directly measure. (Usually +/-10 volts) So you will have

> to design and build your own signal conditioning if you want

> to measure household voltages and current

 

We have a useful app note along these lines:

 

https://labjack.com/support/app-notes/measuring-high-vac

 

 

 

> Measurement Computing USB-200 ($99)
> Cons: Uses VI's instead of DAQmx

 

The LabJack U3 would be our similar USB-only option, or the LabJack T4 would be a similar device with Ethernet & USB. I am not very familiar with MCC's interface, but we use VI's that make calls to our library, rather than using NI's DAQmx.  If the intent is only "studying LabVIEW" as is stated in the subject line of this topic, then indeed this might be a "con" as you might want to learn the DAQmx techniques and they are presumably optimized for LabVIEW, but we generally think of this as a "pro" as the interface with our hardware is basically the same in LabVIEW, C/C++, C#, Java, Python, etc.

 

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Here's a stupid idea...

 

Get 2 USB-RS232 adapters and a Null Modem serial cable.  Personally, I have 2 TRENDnet TU-S9 adapters and then a cable from Microcenter, but if shopping Amazon you can use this one: StarTech.com 2m Black DB9 RS232 Serial Null Modem Cable F/F.  All together $30-$40.

 

But with this setup, you can write code to talk to yourself over two ports.  That's what I did for my presentation: VIWeek 2020/Proper way to communicate over serial


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@Hooovahh wrote:
It comes with a nice palette of functions already written and I2C and SPI are there. 

So if the goal is to get low level hardware experience (I don't know if it is), you might get more of that if you don't use the Arduino as an interface, as all the fun parts are already done for you.

 

You probably could if you don't use the available functions, but that's a bit silly.

 

Anyway, plenty of options with cheap hardware.

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@crossrulz wrote:

Here's a stupid idea...

 

Get 2 USB-RS232 adapters and a Null Modem serial cable.  Personally, I have 2 TRENDnet TU-S9 adapters and then a cable from Microcenter, but if shopping Amazon you can use this one: StarTech.com 2m Black DB9 RS232 Serial Null Modem Cable F/F.  All together $30-$40.

 

But with this setup, you can write code to talk to yourself over two ports.  That's what I did for my presentation: VIWeek 2020/Proper way to communicate over serial


You can use com0com for that. No need for hardware! Of course you won't get the hardware experience.

 

com0com let's you make fake serial ports, route them to tcp\ip ports (com2tcp) or to each other, IIRC. I have used it in the past to monitor serial data.

 

Also great if you have serial hardware and old software that only excepts a serial port. If you want to use a tcp\ip port and a tcp-to-serial convertor (like a moxa), you can use com2tcp to glue it together.

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I would look for (a) new or used device(s) you can use later,

a Rigol or the like scope with usb/ ethernet, or a multimeter with a serial/usb?

While boat anchors  could be cheap(and often have service manuals to repair and learn), most of them need a RS488 (GPIB) and the GPIB2NI hardware is not cheap.

 

Greetings from Germany
Henrik

LV since v3.1

“ground” is a convenient fantasy

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