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Anyone taken the Certified Labview Architect exam?

To say the CLA was easy would be a lie, but NI does make it possible through their training courses, some side reading, and some experience.

A) Prepare at least as much as you did for the CLD. You will be expected to do CLD stuff in addition...

B) If you take all of the course recomended by NI you will have been exposed to most of the book work. (See link below) Let me stop and dwell in this one for a second. The "LabVIEW Advanced Application Devlopement" (or whatever they call it now) is a very good course that teaches a lot of advanced idea that will do you good if you take the test or not. Even if you do not take the CLA exam, concider taking this course!).

http://volt.ni.com/niwc/custed/cecp.jsp

C) Review the topics that you will be tested on. they can be found here.

http://www.ni.com/pdf/custed/us/cla_tasks_and_objectives.pdf

D) There is simply not enough time to test everything a CLA should know. So expect to get in-depth questions on some but not all of the topics.

E) Experience leading groups of developers will be a plus when taking the exam.

F) Putnam; Champion's get a discount on all certification exams! Check with Philip.

All of the above suggestions are general in nature and can be applied to all of NI's exams. I can not and will not reveal that there were this many of these types of Q and this many of these types. Even if I remebered, NI can and will change the test whenever and however they choose. I do not think knowledge of that that type would help more than what I said above about taking the NI Courses.

Take the courses they recomend, study what they teach, practice, and get a good nights sleep.

 

Ben

Retired Senior Automation Systems Architect with Data Science Automation LabVIEW Champion Knight of NI and Prepper LinkedIn Profile YouTube Channel
Message 11 of 28
(2,223 Views)

Khalid asked

"

Can we bring along our favourite LabVIEW.INI file for use at the exam?  That would save some initial setting-up time and make me more "at home."  Of course, the instructor can check the INI beforehand to ensure there are no undocumented SuperSecret.... settings in there .

"
 
NO!
 
As is usually the case, being clever is of no use when it comes time to take a test. If your proctor was like mine (and they are supposed to be ) they will claim that they "know nothing" and do not bother asking!
 
If you review the document I cited elsewhere, you will see that Scripting is not required for the CLA. The CLH (Certified LabVIEW Hacker) exam is still in development. I suggest you consult the LAVA forum for more inforamtion on that exam. (Last I heard, you just have to figure out one new hack, and you are qualified Smiley Surprised ).
 
Ben
Retired Senior Automation Systems Architect with Data Science Automation LabVIEW Champion Knight of NI and Prepper LinkedIn Profile YouTube Channel
Message 12 of 28
(2,219 Views)

One more clarification!

When I recomended taking the Advanced course, my recomendation had nothing to do with the fact that Data Science Automation

dsautomation.com

(my employer) is one of the only organizations qualified to teach that course!

Ben

Retired Senior Automation Systems Architect with Data Science Automation LabVIEW Champion Knight of NI and Prepper LinkedIn Profile YouTube Channel
Message 13 of 28
(2,213 Views)

Ben,

The reason I feel using the personalized LabVIEW.INI file is good because this way we get the LabVIEW environment setup to the way we are used to -- without spending any time.  For instance, the following are some entries from my INI file:

showTipStringsOnDiagram=False
suppressFileDlgForMissingVIs=False
autoRouteWires=False
autoInsertFeedbackNode=False
SnapGridDrawAsLines=1
autoToolOn=False
appFont="Arial" 14

I do agree that the exam administrators, usually the Sales Engineer for the region, does not want to get involved into checking/verifying anything.

-Khalid

Message 14 of 28
(2,204 Views)
Hi Khalid,
 
Those are my settings as well! (Yes Putnam.....)
 
I only mentioned this issue because I alomost failed my CLD re-take exam because I sat down at a LV 7.0 machine when my project work had kept me working in LV 6.1.
 
I read a book called "Mastering College" (Athor unknown) that suggested studying for an exam in the same room where you will be taking the exam. This is to enusre the strange environment does not interfere. Same idea, practice "in the environment" where you will be taking the exam.
 
Ben
Retired Senior Automation Systems Architect with Data Science Automation LabVIEW Champion Knight of NI and Prepper LinkedIn Profile YouTube Channel
Message 15 of 28
(2,198 Views)
I just checked with my boss (CLA #5) who USED to teach that course.
 
Apparently we (Data Science Automation) no longer offer that course!
 
There just wasn't enough call for that course so it has been dropped from our training schedule.
 
Sorry!
 
Ben
Retired Senior Automation Systems Architect with Data Science Automation LabVIEW Champion Knight of NI and Prepper LinkedIn Profile YouTube Channel
Message 16 of 28
(2,193 Views)

My concern regarding "studying in the environment you will be tested" is that most of us won't know until we click on the LabVIEW icon at the exam location. If we did know we might not have access to that version (your and and my friend's experience with 6.1). As the machines we were using at the exam site were apparently setup to teach a LabVIEW course vs give the CLD exam (no floppie drives) it is quite possible that they would have 8.0 on them now, which would be a REALLY alien environment, particularly as it isn't nearly as configurable to look like our much more familiar "classic =<6.1" one (do the marketing/development people consider the lost productivity incurred with these "improvements"?). Unfortunately, with the CLD at least, time is sparse and any disonance caused by these other issues can make all the difference between success and failure.

As far as the various discounts I'm privey to the biggest cost for me was spending two days not doing billable work. Had the exam remained a one parter rather than a CLAD and a CLD it would have cost me a lot less.  Oh well enough sour grapes! Going to get out into the 60 degF weather here in Salt Lake City and look at the snow on the nearby mountains. Hope to go slide down some of them this weekend!

P.M.

Putnam
Certified LabVIEW Developer

Senior Test Engineer North Shore Technology, Inc.
Currently using LV 2012-LabVIEW 2018, RT8.5


LabVIEW Champion



Message 17 of 28
(2,190 Views)

I am not try to stoke a fire here but I should note a critical issue. Part of the "Certified..." part of the title say that the person is familiar with the current version. An extreme example would be if you were a real hot-dog with LV 5.1 (which was a very solid version by the way) but nver saw a control reference. Sorry, you may be good but not "Certified..."

So testing on the current version of LV only makes sense.

Ben

Retired Senior Automation Systems Architect with Data Science Automation LabVIEW Champion Knight of NI and Prepper LinkedIn Profile YouTube Channel
Message 18 of 28
(2,170 Views)

And in a rare moment of disagreement with Ben, when I took the live online CLD prep course two years ago, I asked whether one had to be completely current on the "latest" version and was told no.  This would only seem right, as a new version comes out almost yearly, and while they usually have a number of new and cool features, the point of having a Certification process is to demonstrate a level of compentancy with the tool, not that one knows every aspect of the latest released version. The vast majority of LabVIEWers of all skill levels do not get access to the latest version of LabVIEW for some time after its release.  Nothing in the prep course required a knowledge of some aspect unique to the then current version, more an overall conceptual understanding of developing programs in LabVIEW and a knowledge of its major features. The only real way to develop compentecy and skills in almost any complex endevour is to use the tools/instruments repeatedly over a wide variety of "projects", which would be extremely difficult with a recently released version. LabVIEW 8 has been out less than 6 months, so an expectation of the "average" skilled LabVIEWer having had the opportunity to delve into its minutia is unrealistic, and yet this same LabVIEWer could be an extremely skilled practioner of the art in labVIEW 7.1.1. The problem comes up when (s)he goes to the exam site at TechnoLabResourcesIncCorp to take the exam and the machine(s) they are dedicating to the exam happen to be the ones they have set up for their LabVIEW training course next week, set up with, understandably, the latest version, LabVIEW 8. Does the mental disonance caused when LabVIEW 8 comes up in the project mode, has the palettes in different locations, etc., mean that the testee is not a competent LabVIEW programmer? But as you noted Ben, and as all of us , for the most part VERY (myself excepted) skilled LabVIEW programmers did last summer during the NIWeek "code off", we immediately changed the 7.1.1 environment to something familiar to us. If you don't know how to do this, or if it is for the large part undoable, there is a loss of productivity, and a distraction from what is really being tested. With what is a pretty limited time limit to take the test (or code off against someone else) that lack of productivity can make the difference between success and failure. Do I expect that all Cert exams be given in v5.1, no, but should you be thrown into a very different 8.0 environment only months after it is released? I'm already annoyed that the environment has become less configurable, to make it somehow more approachable to the new user (can you say BIG icons on the diagram), but at the same time cut into the productivity of those who have been using it for quite a while as they try and retrain themselves to negotiate the new landscape, spend time looking for the function that use to be a click in the upper left and is now hidden is some other location. Its like while you were asleep at home someone sneaks in and moves your furniture around. When you get up in the dark you crash into the couch, trip over the chair. The furniture is still all there, but you will crash around for a while to you figure it all out, and untimately not make it to the loo in time!  

Rant off, lunch done, back to work.Smiley Wink

 

Putnam
Certified LabVIEW Developer

Senior Test Engineer North Shore Technology, Inc.
Currently using LV 2012-LabVIEW 2018, RT8.5


LabVIEW Champion



Message 19 of 28
(2,123 Views)

And in a rare moment of disagreement with Ben, when I took the live online CLD prep course two years ago, I asked whether one had to be completely current on the "latest" version and was told no.  This would only seem right, as a new version comes out almost yearly, and while they usually have a number of new and cool features, the point of having a Certification process is to demonstrate a level of compentancy with the tool, not that one knows every aspect of the latest released version. The vast majority of LabVIEWers of all skill levels do not get access to the latest version of LabVIEW for some time after its release.  Nothing in the prep course required a knowledge of some aspect unique to the then current version, more an overall conceptual understanding of developing programs in LabVIEW and a knowledge of its major features. The only real way to develop compentecy and skills in almost any complex endevour is to use the tools/instruments repeatedly over a wide variety of "projects", which would be extremely difficult with a recently released version. LabVIEW 8 has been out less than 6 months, so an expectation of the "average" skilled LabVIEWer having had the opportunity to delve into its minutia is unrealistic, and yet this same LabVIEWer could be an extremely skilled practioner of the art in labVIEW 7.1.1. The problem comes up when (s)he goes to the exam site at TechnoLabResourcesIncCorp to take the exam and the machine(s) they are dedicating to the exam happen to be the ones they have set up for their LabVIEW training course next week, set up with, understandably, the latest version, LabVIEW 8. Does the mental disonance caused when LabVIEW 8 comes up in the project mode, has the palettes in different locations, etc., mean that the testee is not a competent LabVIEW programmer? But as you noted Ben, and as all of us , for the most part VERY (myself excepted) skilled LabVIEW programmers did last summer during the NIWeek "code off", we immediately changed the 7.1.1 environment to something familiar to us. If you don't know how to do this, or if it is for the large part undoable, there is a loss of productivity, and a distraction from what is really being tested. With what is a pretty limited time limit to take the test (or code off against someone else) that lack of productivity can make the difference between success and failure. Do I expect that all Cert exams be given in v5.1, no, but should you be thrown into a very different 8.0 environment only months after it is released? I'm already annoyed that the environment has become less configurable, to make it somehow more approachable to the new user (can you say BIG icons on the diagram), but at the same time cut into the productivity of those who have been using it for quite a while as they try and retrain themselves to negotiate the new landscape, spend time looking for the function that use to be a click in the upper left and is now hidden is some other location. Its like while you were asleep at home someone sneaks in and moves your furniture around. When you get up in the dark you crash into the couch, trip over the chair. The furniture is still all there, but you will crash around for a while to you figure it all out, and ultimately not make it to the loo in time!  

Rant off, lunch done, back to work.Smiley Wink

 

Putnam
Certified LabVIEW Developer

Senior Test Engineer North Shore Technology, Inc.
Currently using LV 2012-LabVIEW 2018, RT8.5


LabVIEW Champion



Message 20 of 28
(2,126 Views)