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shift register loop tunnel connection issue

Status: New

Problem:

in many cases after wiring in the loop , we will go for the shift register to store variable. but in case of changing the loop tunnel to shift register left side tunnel required to connect manually.if not it creates the another tunnel in the loop.

 

solution:

in the loop , if the left and right tunnel variable are same , LabVIEW automatically replace tunnels with the shift registers.

 

shift registers.JPG

 

 

6 Comments
Proven Zealot

Your suggestion works only for simple examples. What if the right output tunnel type has 5 matching types on the left?

 

What if there's no direct connection between the right and left tunnels?

 

I suppose LV could sometimes automatically pick the matching tunnel. For instance if

  1. there's only one matching tunnel,
  2. If there's a straight connection, with only one tunnel on the other side.

Arguably, most cases are simple cases... I think I'd like the automatic shift register if possible. +1 for now...

Active Participant

You may know this already, but based on the screenshot, perhaps not.  After you select replace with shift register, you can then click on the tunnel on the other side of the loop to convert it to a shift register.  This saves you having to delete the old tunnel and connect up the shift register.

 

 

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Tim Elsey
Certified LabVIEW Architect
Proven Zealot

>After you select replace with shift register, you can then click on the tunnel on the other side of the loop to convert it to a shift register.  

 

That was the first thing I typed. Then, for once, I reread the post.

 

"left side tunnel required to connect manually. if not it creates the another tunnel in the loop." can only mean exactly that. 

Active Participant

@ wrote:

That was the first thing I typed. Then, for once, I reread the post.

 

"left side tunnel required to connect manually. if not it creates the another tunnel in the loop." can only mean exactly that.


 


I would have thought so, but the screenshot shows that's not what he did.  He has the tunnel and shift register stacked, indicating he did not click on the original tunnel to convert it.

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Tim Elsey
Certified LabVIEW Architect
Proven Zealot
@ wrote:

That was the first thing I typed. Then, for once, I reread the post.

 

"left side tunnel required to connect manually. if not it creates the another tunnel in the loop." can only mean exactly that.

I would have thought so, but the screenshot shows that's not what he did.  He has the tunnel and shift register stacked, indicating he did not click on the original tunnel to convert it.

I think that's the point of the idea. At the moment, you have to manually select the tunnel, even though LV could do this automatically.

 

I translated the idea to "avoid having to manually select the tunnel if it's obvious\unambiguous".

 

I could do with fewer clicks, and it would also save mouse movement.

Active Participant

I agree, that's what the idea is, and it's a fine idea.  LabVIEW can do it with the Linked Input Tunnels, so it ought to be able to do with with a shift register. 

 

I was simply trying to save the OP a few clicks (not all of them) because it looks like he didn't select the left tunnel.  For years I would select Replace with shift register, then click the mouse to drop the opposite shift register over the existing tunnel.  Then, I had to delete the original tunnel and wire up the shift register.  Had I clicked the original tunnel LabVIEW would have done the rewiring for me.  It took me several years to realize I could do that.

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Tim Elsey
Certified LabVIEW Architect