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Do you have an idea for LabVIEW NXG?


Use the in-product feedback feature to tell us what we’re doing well and what we can improve. NI R&D monitors feedback submissions and evaluates them for upcoming LabVIEW NXG releases. Tell us what you think!

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The proposal consists in allowing to visualize more information in a project about the elements it contains.

 

Image21.png

 

For example: VI Description, Type, Application Instance, VI Path, …

 

Image11.png

 

Regards.

The recently introduced Raspberry Pi is a 32 bit ARM based microcontroller board that is very popular. It would be great if we could programme it in LabVIEW. This product could leverage off the already available LabVIEW Embedded for ARM and the LabVIEW Microcontroller SDK (or other methods of getting LabVIEW to run on it).

 

The Raspberry Pi is a $35 (with Ethernet) credit card sized computer that is open hardware. The ARM chip is an Atmel ARM11 running at 700 MHz resulting in 875 MIPS of performance. By way of comparison, the current LabVIEW Embedded for ARM Tier 1 (out-of-the-box experience) boards have only 60 MIPS of processing power. So, about 15 times the processing power!

 

Wouldn’t it be great to programme the Raspberry Pi in LabVIEW?

I find it always a hassle to create an asynchronous call with the need of the "Open VI Reference" block. A strict static VI reference should be sufficient. Options should be either available in the properties via context menu, via property node or as input of the "Start Asynchronous Call Node".

 

I didn't go through the effort to create a property menu example, but here is an a graphic showing the help example and what I would wish for:

 

Call Options Example.png

A quick one-button solution to view pre-configured Design Rule results per VI. Not quite an analyzer.  One layer (VI) deep. Pull-down icon changes from green check mark to the Alert symbol suggested here if violations exist.

 

LV_LIVE_DRC.png

Currently, having one misconnected wire breaks the entire wire tree and pressing ctrl+b wipes out everything. Poof!

 

In the vast majority of (my) scenarios, a broken wire is due to a small problem isolated to one branch so it does not make sense to drag the entire wire from the source to all valid destinations down with it and break everything in the process.

 

Here is a simplified example to illustrate the problem (see picture).

 

 

In (A) we have mostly good code. If we add a wire as shown, that wire (and VI!) must break of course because such a wire would not make any sense.

 

However, it does not make sense to also break the good, existing branches of the wire (the cluster in this case), but that is exactly what we get today as shown in (B). If we press ctrl+b at this point, all broken wires will disappear and we would have to start wiring from scratch (or undo, of course Smiley Happy). Even the context help and tip strip is misleading, because it claims that the "source is a cluster ... the sink is long ...", while that is only true for 25% of the sinks in this case!

 

What we should get instead is shown in part (C). Only the tiny bad wire branch should break, leaving all the good connection untouched. Pressing ctrl+b at this point should only remove the short bad wire.

 

The entire wire should only be broken in cases where nothing is OK along its entire length, e.g. if there is no source or if it connects to two different data sources, for example.

 

Summary: Good parts of a wire should remain intact if only some of the branches are bad. Wires that go to a destination compatible with the wire source should not break.

 

(Similarly, for dangling wires, the red X should be on the broken branch, not on the good source wire as it is today)

 

Implementation of this idea would significantly help in isolating the location of the problem. Currently, one small mistake will potentially cover the entire diagram with broken wires going in all directions and finding the actual problem is much more difficult than it should be.

So when it comes to using a queue, there is a somewhat common design pattern used by NI examples, which makes a producer consumer loop, where the consumer uses a dequeue function with a timeout of -1.  This means the function will wait forever until an event comes in.  But a neat feature of this function is it also returns when the queue reference becomes invalid, which can happen if the queue reference is closed, or if the VI that created that reference stops running.

 

This idea is to have similar functionality when it comes to user events.  I have a common design pattern with a publisher subscriber design where a user event is created and multiple loops register for it.  If for some reason the main VI stops, that reference becomes invalid but my other asynchronous loops will continue running.  In the past I've added a timeout case, where I check to see if the user event is still valid once every 5 seconds or so, and if it isn't then I go through my shutdown process.

 

What I am thinking is that there could be another event to register for, which gets generated when that user event which is registered for, becomes invalid so that polling for the validity of the user event isn't necessary.

 

before:

before.png

after:

after.png

I just ran into a situation today where I had a case structure with approximately 64 frames in it, 48 of which I wanted to remove.

 

The method of right-click the selector, select "Remove Case" (This step is right beside the "Insert Case" which is frustrating), repeat 48 times while the mouse is wandering all over the screen between the case selector and the menu selection..... cue carpal tunnel problems.

 

I really wished I could just either use the "delete" and "insert" buttons to mimic the appropriate menu selections

-OR-

Be able to select multiple cases from the "Rearrange cases" window and select "Delete".

It would be good to have Search an Array and give the number of times the search element is available in the array.

Count of elements.jpg

 

 

 

 

Most of us have made this logic with for loop with an increment if it matches

 

 

  It would be very usefull to know which VIs are still running.

   aaaa.png

There are already a couple ideas to retain wire values on a hierarchy (here and here). This is a request to disable (or toggle) the 'retain wire values' option on all VIs of a hierarchy in the same vein as 'disable breakpoints on hierarchy'. This request was spurred by an investigation into VI performance on resizing a very large 2D array of strings, wherein several memory allocation strategies and lookup strategies (arrays, maps, variants) had been exhausted, only to discover that a subVI whose (front panel and diagram had been closed) was set to retain wire values. Merely toggling the retain wire value setting off on this particular subVI improved performance by approximately one order of magnitude for this particular project.

 

Investigating and accurately measuring run-time LabVIEW performance can be challenging with so many debugging tools available, the impacts of which are not immediately obvious. For this reason, I would like to see a menu option that recurses on VI hierarchy and toggles the 'retain wire values' option, in the same vein as the option which removes all breakpoints from VI hierarchy. The option would be very helpful with run-time performance investigation or optimization.

Browsing through menus to replace a numeric conversion node is tedious.  How about allowing the selector tool to select from a pull-down menu, just like it does from an unbundle by name node?

 

Existing unbundle node behavior is shown at left.  Desired numeric conversion node behavior is to the right.

 

Quick_changing_of_numeric_comments.png

With the advent of the IoT and the growing need to synchronize automation applications  and other TSN (Time Sensitive Networking) use cases UTC (Coordinated Universal Time) is becoming more and more problematic.  Currently, there are 37 seconds not accounted for in the TimeStamp Which is stored in UTC.  The current I64 portion of the timestamp datatype that holds number of seconds elapsed since 0:00:00 Dec 31, 1900 GMT is simply ignoring Leap Seconds.  This is consistent with most modern programming languages and is not a flaw of LabVIEW per se but isn't quite good enough for where the future is heading   In fact, there is a joint IERS/IEEE working group on TSN 

 

Enter TAI or International Atomic Time: TAI has the advantage of being contiguous and is based on the SI second making it ideal for IA applications.  Unfortunately, a LabVIEW Timestamp cannot be formated in TAI.   Entering a time of 23:59:60 31 Dec 2016, a real second that did ocurr, is not allowed.  Currently IERS Bulletin C is published to Give the current UTC-TAI offset but, required extensive code to implement the lookup and well, the text.text just won't display properly in a %<>T or %^<>T (local abs time container and UTC Abs time container)  We need a %#<>T TAI time container format specifier. (Or soon will!)

save_wire.png

I occasionally hide controls on my FP and control their visibility programmatically during the execution of my program. The problem is that if I edit my UI and the control is hidden, it's very easy not to be aware that it's there and to accidentally overlap it, hide it or even move it off the screen.

 

To solve this, I usually try to save the VIs with all the controls visible, but that's not always feasible.


A better solution - LabVIEW should always show hidden controls in edit mode. It should just have some way of differentiating them from visible controls. This mockup shows them as ghosts, but it can also be any other solution:

 

20779iD19E3A04FFDC0A31

 

In run mode, of course, the control would not be shown. This is similar to the black border you get when objects overlap a tab control.

 

                                            "Build Path" should be Growable

 

                              something like this,

 

 

toto.png

If there are multiple projects with the same name listed in the Recent Projects list, there's no way to determine which is which:

 

recent_project_tooltip.png

 

The idea is to display a tooltip showing the full path of the project when hovering over an entry.

OK, using Malleble VIs is cool. Imaging being able to not only wrap code around a variable datatype but wrapping an object around a variable datatype.

 

I personally have quite a few classes which do pretty much exactly the same thing but which only differ by the precide datatype contained within its private cluster.  No changes in the number of elements, no changes in methods, only the datatype of the specific data.

 

Obviously, the datatype would have to be compatible with all methods and VIs of the class which use that data field or we would have broken code.

Once in a while I encounter a case or event list that forces me to grow the structure

- in order to keep the list readable:

Selector.png

It would be nice if the item-list would automatically "wrap" instead.  

Selector4.png

I would like to have the possibility to "negate" some comparison functions such as "Empty String/Path?". This can avoid to add the "Not" operator.

The picture below is a possible implementation. The dot on the input (on the output ok also) is showing the negation.

Labview Idea.png

This might be good to be implemented for the following functions:

Labview Idea 2.png

Hi,

 

When I use array constants on the block diagram I often expand them to show how many elements they contain - I even expand them one element further than their contents to leave no doubt that no elements are hiding below the lowest visible element:

 

Array_ordinary.png

 

Often it's not so important to know how many elements are in the arrays, nor even their values (one can always scroll through the array if one needs to know). But it can be very important to not get a false impression of a fewer number of elements than is actually present, for instance when auto-indexing a For-loop:

 

Array_loop.png

 

To be able to shrink array constants to a minimum size while still signalling that they contain more elements than currently visible, it would be nice with an indicator on the array constant when it's shrunk to hide elements (here shown with a tooltip that would appear if you hover on the "more elements" dots):

 

Array_more.png

 

The information in the tooltip would be better placed in context help, but the important aspect of this idea is the "more elements" indicator itself.

 

Cheers,

Steen