LabVIEW Developers Feature Brainstorming

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Now available for download: "Randomize 1D Array.vi" that accepts any array type

A couple names that come to mind:

 

Adaptive VI

Metamorphic VI

 

 

So, why the secrecy?

____
Ryan R.
R&D
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Message 21 of 28
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@morgol wrote:

 

 

 

So, why the secrecy?


I wouldn't worry too much.  I suspect that the souce is quite similar to this post on Lava posted in 2006.

 

http://lavag.org/topic/3238-randomise-array/page__view__findpost__p__15993

 

If you need to use this code and have the source available you can use the Lava version.

 


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Message 22 of 28
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Old thread, but in any case, it's not the algorithm that's secret, rather the way of creating a "generic" input/output type.  Still waiting for some light to be shed on that...

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Message 23 of 28
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Sorry I guess I'm clueless in more than one way.  I thought this thread had some new reply to it.


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Message 24 of 28
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Note that this whole post is speculation:

 

I believe that this feature is likely already built into LabVIEW.  Scripting was a feature that NI had for some time and used for programatically writing code.  Scripting was built into LabVIEW but was hidden until you entered the secret INI key into LabVIEW.ini.  Then you had a whole set of new methods to use.  If you wrote a VI using one of these new methods, then copied the VI to another machine that didn't have scripting enabled you would still see the method being called and could copy it to another VI, but you didn't have all the scripting functions just the one that was made on the machine that had the INI key enabled.  

 

I'd speculate that this Generic VI feature works the same way.  You enable an INI key and it allows you to make controls that change to the data type that is needed.  You can make copies of the controls and use them in new VIs, but without the ini key you are limited to the controls made by others who have the INI key.

 

This Generic VI feature would be the biggest thing since scripting and I can't wait for it to be released.  Is there any update to when/if we will be able to use this feature in our own VIs?


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Message 25 of 28
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@Hooovahh wrote:
Is there any update to when/if we will be able to use this feature in our own VIs?

Unfortunately, the approach we were using turned out to have some severe drawbacks, so it's back to the research side of R&D.

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Message 26 of 28
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Highlighted

Old thread, but for reference:

"Available in LabVIEW 2017. Use Malleable VIs (.vim files) to define a generic implementation for a single subVI that will adapt to multiple wired input data types."

 

Quoted from this idea.

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Message 27 of 28
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Also, since people were wondering, it's actually pretty simple how he made it, at least I'm 99% sure this is how he did it. Add "GenericsAreGo=True" to LabVIEW.ini, and then there will be a new "Generic" option whenever you right-click a control or indicator. Selecting this option will make it so the control/indicator behaves like the VI he posted. But this of course is not at all safe to do; it can corrupt VI's or whatever. The only valid reason I can think of for doing this is if you're curious and want to experiment with an old, obsolete, buggy part of LabVIEW. Especially now that there's an officially-supported feature that does essentially the same thing now.

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Message 28 of 28
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