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LabVIEW 2020 CE cannot add Raspberry Pi to project.

I tried three different vi's and got the same error.

I followed instructions at makerhub when I set this up and they highly recomended a pi version in a reference link to a 2019 version "scratch" I believe.

I just tried a December 2020 version and it works;-)

One other question I have had in the back of my mind. How does one plot data on the raspberry pi desktop? Can any front panel controls or indicators be used ?

 

Really thank you for the responses.  This has been interesting.

 

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@waas wrote:

 

One other question I have had in the back of my mind. How does one plot data on the raspberry pi desktop? Can any front panel controls or indicators be used ?


Not really, or more correctly not directly. LabVIEW on the Raspberry Pi runs in its own chroot Debian distribution as a headless system. This means it has no connection to the display and doesn't even contain code to draw anything on a display even if it was available. This is an inheritance from the fact that the LabVIEW runtime used on the Raspberry Pi is simply a repurposed image from the NI cRIO ARM controllers which all do not have a display connector either. Only some of the x64 based cRIO controllers have a minimal form of display output but that one is very basic. The VIs really just use a barebones XWindows system there.

 

What you have to do is to add some way to your LabVIEW program to provide data in some way to another application to let it visualize this. The typical use case with the cRIO controllers is that you have another LabVIEW application on a Windows (or Mac or Linux host) and communicate from there with the cRIO application, usually through some network communication, and display the data on the host system.

Other possibilities are to use WebServices in your LabVIEW application that can be accessed through any WebService client. Or add a full featured HTTP server interface to your application to let a normal web browser connect to it. All of these solutions are quite a bit more complex than pointing and clicking a few components together and require some form of network knowledge that goes quite beyond knowing which connector plugs in which outlet. 😁

 

Another not trivial option might be to directly communicate from your LabVIEW application to some LCD display connected to the Raspberry Pi, for instance through I2C.

Rolf Kalbermatter
Averna BV
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@waas wrote:

One other question I have had in the back of my mind. How does one plot data on the raspberry pi desktop? Can any front panel controls or indicators be used ?

 


Rolf gave you an overview and many different ways this can be handled, though he did not bring up WebVIs.  I would say this would be NI's "suggested" way to plot data on the Raspberry Pi desktop.  WebVIs were introduced in LabVIEW NXG and will continue to be available through the G Web Development Software.  Here is a good reference to get you started with WebVIs: User Interfaces with LabVIEW NXG WebVIs.

David Wilt
The New Standard LLC
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I am probably totally out to lunch and I know very little about programming a raspberry pie. That is one reason the labview route seemed like a fun thing to do. 

That being said in reality  things get complicated fast.

Here is a video of sampling temperature data, saving and plotting it. 

It just seems like one should be able to call some routines from the labview code after collecting data to run plot routines or display data.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNbsyHocM2U

Seems like it would be reasonably simple but then "ignorance is bliss". 

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