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What is this and what is it used for


Some insects like Gall wasps...


I thought it was some kind of Mushroom 😉

Message 251 of 294
(4,411 Views)

@SnowMule wrote:
Zorak!

 

Praying Mantis are great for pest control. If you get a chance, watch "Monster Bug Wars" on Youtube and you will see that praying mantis and large spiders are at the top of the food chain in the bug world. No chemicals involved and pests are control by the praying mantis.

 

 

I have not had to resort to any artificial means to deal with bugs getting at my gardens. Now if I could only find a praying mantis large enough to keep ground hogs and Bambi under control.

 

Ben

 

Retired Senior Automation Systems Architect with Data Science Automation LabVIEW Champion Knight of NI and Prepper LinkedIn Profile YouTube Channel
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Message 252 of 294
(4,381 Views)

@Ben wrote:

I have not had to resort to any artificial means to deal with bugs getting at my gardens. Now if I could only find a praying mantis large enough to keep ground hogs and Bambi under control. 


I've seen enough bad movies to know that this won't end well. In fact...

 

Matt J | National Instruments | CLA
Message 253 of 294
(4,377 Views)

@Henrik_Volkers wrote:

Last time I run mine

lamp small.jpg

I used denaturated alcohol... about 30 years ago??  (wasn't actually mine at that time 😉 )

But I was told that it also can run with gasoline/petrol ...just the smell isn't that good 😉

 

-Fill the tank not more than half

-punmp 25 times for pressure, don't put too much pressure on it since:

-fill the shell with a spoonfull  alcohol too and ignite it to pre heat the burner.

-after the free alc/gas is burned, hold a flame in front of the burner and open the valve.

 

(the 'shell' in my lamp is on top of the tank)

 

Do it outside, check the valve before!  Maybe better drop it ....     (You didn't found a youtube HOWTO??)

 

BTW: Nice collection of old control equipment, Ben 🙂

 

 

Here is another one: (Found on the street.... many many years ago)


OK, scrolled down from the post and saw that it had been ID'd.>>>>>>>

From a Nixdorf brand computer I think. I service them here in the US in the late 70's, early 80's, the plug in "boards" looked like they were built for Panzer's. The user interface was a heavily modified IBM Selectric type writer, a real pain to adjust/repair. Still have the spring hooks and small tubes of IBM grease in my toolbox

Putnam
Certified LabVIEW Developer

Senior Test Engineer North Shore Technology, Inc.
Currently using LV 2012-LabVIEW 2018, RT8.5


LabVIEW Champion



Message 254 of 294
(4,289 Views)

@LV_Pro wrote:

@Henrik_Volkers wrote:

Here is another one: (Found on the street.... many many years ago)


OK, scrolled down from the post and saw that it had been ID'd.>>>>>>>

From a Nixdorf brand computer I think. I service them here in the US in the late 70's, early 80's, the plug in "boards" looked like they were built for Panzer's. The user interface was a heavily modified IBM Selectric type writer, a real pain to adjust/repair. Still have the spring hooks and small tubes of IBM grease in my toolbo


actually this is a wired ROM from an Nixdorf Wanderer build in the mid 60's. Developed by MIT this technique stored the apollo board computer code Smiley Happy

Nice link with explanation and other fancy old storage types: http://www.technikum29.de/en/computer/storage-media

 

I still have other boards of it... some frames just open like a book. each PCB covered with two aliminium covers .. , mostly gone now...were needed for other stuff in my childhood.  Real HARDWARE.

 

And your TRIOPS is the right avatar. I was about 14 when this stuff was junk (OK, NEVER was junk!! just outdated 😉😄

 

 

Greetings from Germany
Henrik

LV since v3.1

“ground” is a convenient fantasy

'˙˙˙˙uıɐƃɐ lɐıp puɐ °06 ǝuoɥd ɹnoʎ uɹnʇ ǝsɐǝld 'ʎɹɐuıƃɐɯı sı pǝlɐıp ǝʌɐɥ noʎ ɹǝqɯnu ǝɥʇ'


Message 255 of 294
(4,252 Views)

The Nixdorf computer equipment was the bane of my existence back in the late 70's. Most of them were in insurance company claims processing offices, and while the computer part generally worked ok, if something on the IBM Selectric went out of whack ... The had been heavily modified, had a bunch of magnetic sensors that read metal flags deep within the bowels of the IBM. When one of those died I had to remove a bunch of layers of mechanical parts to access. Putting everything back together was a pain, particularly as there were adjustments that were literally bending little tabs, which if they broke off meant another layer of disassembly and wash and repeat. As to core memories, I remember loading a diagnostic onto an 8K core for a Data General Nova series machine, hand carrying it from New York state to Ohio on the plane (security was, well, less secure) and plugging it in to run the diagnostic on the target machine. Otherwise it was hooking up a paper tape reader and after hand toggling a boot loader routine in through the toggle switches on the front panel, reading in the tape, hoping that it read ok (nothing would tell you while it read). Ah, booting my laptop with its solid state hard drive is so much easier!

Putnam
Certified LabVIEW Developer

Senior Test Engineer North Shore Technology, Inc.
Currently using LV 2012-LabVIEW 2018, RT8.5


LabVIEW Champion



Message 256 of 294
(4,241 Views)

@LV_Pro wrote:

...Otherwise it was hooking up a paper tape reader and after hand toggling a boot loader routine in through the toggle switches on the front panel, reading in the tape, hoping that it read ok (nothing would tell you while it read). Ah, booting my laptop with its solid state hard drive is so much easier!


But the good thing about core memory is we did not have to reload the code every-time it powered up.

 

Ben

Retired Senior Automation Systems Architect with Data Science Automation LabVIEW Champion Knight of NI and Prepper LinkedIn Profile YouTube Channel
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Message 257 of 294
(4,223 Views)

@Ben wrote:

e good thing about core memory is we did not have to reload the code every-time it powered up.

 


Of course once something is corrupted, rebooting also does not fix anything 😄

 

(Manually entering a 21(?) word assembly program one bit at a time to be able to load a small punch tape containing a fancier paper punch tape reading code to load the actual "OS". :D)

Message 258 of 294
(4,193 Views)

@altenbach wrote:

@Ben wrote:

e good thing about core memory is we did not have to reload the code every-time it powered up.

 


Of course once something is corrupted, rebooting also does not fix anything 😄

 

(Manually entering a 21(?) word assembly program one bit at a time to be able to load a small punch tape containing a fancier paper punch tape reading code to load the actual "OS". :D)


Yup!

 

A toggle-in to load the bootstrap loader and then use the bootstrap loader to load the application.

 

It wasn't until about 1983 when I encounter the first computers that actually had an Operating System.

 

Re: Corrupted memory

 

I was supporting  machine that was running into issues with corrupted memory...

 

Eventually I used a debugger to determine the application was not checking the size of the buffer where the messages written to the teletype. Turns out under the wrong conditions, the ASCII text started over-writing the configuration data.

 

Since a time was part of the printed data, the effects were always different.

 

"Those were the days my friend, we thought..."

 

Ben

Retired Senior Automation Systems Architect with Data Science Automation LabVIEW Champion Knight of NI and Prepper LinkedIn Profile YouTube Channel
Message 259 of 294
(4,176 Views)

Hey look, I found some blank media 😄

 

 

Message 260 of 294
(4,172 Views)