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This is Hooovahh

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@Hooovahh wrote:

The teacher asked about one section of the story and wanted to know if there was a significant detail we were missing.  


Silence seems to be the correct response 😊.

 

 

Spoiler

 If you're missing the detail, you can't tell. And if you're not missing it, you shouldn't tell.

 

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Message 211 of 283
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What document?

 

I got an email from our quality group saying that document XYZ was late for review and that I needed to provide it as soon as possible.  I was confused and called the quality manager and asked “How can I be late for that, I’ve never even heard of that document.” They replied: “Well we have a daily quality meeting at 6AM that you are invited to, where we assigned that document to you”.  “Yeah, I’m not going to show up to that. I’m here until 5 P.M. or 6 P.M. most days, if you want to schedule a meeting later I’ll be glad to show up."  I said this knowing this group of employees usually were done around 2 P.M.

 

Randomly assigning work and deadlines without notifying people seemed crazy to me.  Especially given the fact that performance reviews might depend on the timeliness of these documents.

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Message 212 of 283
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@Hooovahh wrote:

 

 

Randomly assigning work and deadlines without notifying people seemed crazy to me.  


Haha, the joke around here is that as soon as you step out of a meeting to use the bathroom you get action items. Well, it's half-joke and half-truth.

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Message 213 of 283
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@Hooovahh wrote:

“Well we have a daily quality meeting at 6AM that you are invited to, where we assigned that document to you”.


I'm one of the early people and I'm usually just leaving the house at 6.  Anybody there hear of "core hours"?  You know, when you expect 95% of the people to be in the building.  Meetings should almost never be outside of 8am to 3pm.

Spoiler
Granted, the joke around here is about software engineers who don't show up until 11 if they are being early.

GCentral
There are only two ways to tell somebody thanks: Kudos and Marked Solutions
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"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" - 2 Corinthians 3:5
Message 214 of 283
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“Well we have a daily quality meeting at 6AM that you are invited to,

They should look for the email that comes back saying that you declined their invitation.  But, we know nobody reads those either.  I love declining meeting invitations!

Jim
You're entirely bonkers. But I'll tell you a secret. All the best people are. ~ Alice
For he does not know what will happen; So who can tell him when it will occur? Eccl. 8:7

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Message 215 of 283
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@jcarmody wrote: I love declining meeting invitations!

If you are feeling passionate about declining a meeting, you can actually send the decline many times.  With Outlook, you can go into your Deleted Items and decline the invitation again.  A few of us filled up a co-worker's email with just meeting declines (we were bored and each of us declined the meeting at least 10 times).


GCentral
There are only two ways to tell somebody thanks: Kudos and Marked Solutions
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"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" - 2 Corinthians 3:5
Message 216 of 283
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@jcarmody wrote:

“Well we have a daily quality meeting at 6AM that you are invited to,

They should look for the email that comes back saying that you declined their invitation.  But, we know nobody reads those either.  I love declining meeting invitations!


Well I didn't decline, but I did propose a new time through Outlook...which was ignored.

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Message 217 of 283
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@crossrulz wrote:

@jcarmody wrote: I love declining meeting invitations!

If you are feeling passionate about declining a meeting, you can actually send the decline many times.  With Outlook, you can go into your Deleted Items and decline the invitation again.  A few of us filled up a co-worker's email with just meeting declines (we were bored and each of us declined the meeting at least 10 times).


If you are all that bored... maybe reply.  " tentative...bring doughnuts "

"Should be" isn't "Is" -Jay
Message 218 of 283
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Pressure Bomb

(Long one sorry) I was working on a test system that would dry the air.  Now in doing this it sometimes was necessary to make the air more humidity so that it could then be dried.  This was done by filling a very large tank full of tap water, heating it up, and then opening valves letting it into the area where it can then be dried.  The tank would be filled up automatically once a lower threshold in the tank was met, basically as more water was needed it would turn on. The tank was quite large and not expected to need to fill up often.  The heater control was done with my software and wasn’t a PID. It was simply if temp was less than the setpoint, turn it on, if it was greater, turn it off. With such a large amount of water this held to within 1 degree C because it took so long to heat and cool which was fine because it didn’t need to be super precise.  Once a test was done the purge valves could be opened which let out all the steam and humid air we had made to reset the test to be ready to run again. This purge was out the top of the tester.

 

While the system was drying the air it would release the air that had been dried in front of the tester where the DUT was placed.  If you placed your hand there you would feel a sorta moist warm air and after running a long time maybe a couple of drops would form on the floor.  Tests may run for several hours, but there never was much moisture so we just let it go on the floor.

 

So I left a test system to run over night after several days of development for a test.  And when I came in someone was complaining that my tester was leaking all over the floor.  When I came up to it the air that the device was drying which usually just made moist air, was pouring what seemed like a cup of water every 30 seconds onto the floor.  Odd I thought, let's investigate. I went up to my software and noticed all of Windows had locked up. Being a non real-time system this meant all controls were stuck in the last commanded position, and this meant the heater had been on, for 16 hours or so.  I checked the heater tank and the temperature railed at 200C. I quickly ran over to the fill valve and made sure it didn’t turn on. If the water level lowered and cold tap water was let into the tank full of 200 degree C metal it would flash steam expanding and creating even more pressure than this massive tank already had.  I manually turned the heater off and manually set all valves to stay in the position they were in. I was worried something would open up and all of the sudden something would get released in a way that wasn’t safe. It was essentially a very large water and metal bomb.

 

Well turns out this just happened to be the day the customer was coming in to inspect the system.  The reason I was running the night before was because it takes several hours to run a test and the idea was the test would be completed by the time they came in and could inspect the results.  So while it sat there slowly cooling, I decided to try one thing to help it speed up. Normally the purge valve is used after the test is done to release the moist air to start again. I knew that I could try to it on to release the hot air and possibly cool it faster.  These were new high quality solenoid valves and so my plan was to use my software (once I had fixed it) to turn it on, and then off as fast as I could just to see what happened. If nothing happened I’d leave the valve open and help dry it quicker. So I quickly double clicked the button turning it on and then off, in that 100ms or so a geyser of hot water sprayed out the top of the tester hitting the ceiling 30 feet up and spraying down on the rest of the build area.  Immediately everyone in the shop groaned and yelled. I knew I just had to let it set and cool on its own. When the customer came in we explained what had happened and he wasn’t too concerned. We showed him the data and he said it was going to take a few days for it to dry out to be ready to run again. I was just glad I didn’t kill everyone that day.  After that we installed a hardware temperature limiter which ensured that wouldn't happen again.

Message 219 of 283
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@Hooovahh wrote:

I went up to my software and noticed all of Windows had locked up. Being a non real-time system this meant all controls were stuck in the last commanded position, and this meant the heater had been on, for 16 hours or so.


This is why Windows should never be used for a control, especially safety, system.  I don't even like using RT for the actual controls but go for the FPGA on a cRIO or Ethernet expansion chassis.  Yes, I have seen RT systems lock up, just not nearly as often as Windows.  But FPGA will just keep going as long as it has power or doesn't get reset.


GCentral
There are only two ways to tell somebody thanks: Kudos and Marked Solutions
Unofficial Forum Rules and Guidelines
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" - 2 Corinthians 3:5
Message 220 of 283
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