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This is Hooovahh


@Hooovahh wrote:

We were working with another division of our company based in another country.  We were doing some work for them and giving them feedback on the progress of the work.  We were working with a single point of contact and had email back and forth everyday or multiple times a day, and had early or late meetings due to the time zone difference.

 

One evening we sent out an email asking for details on the work we were doing.  In the morning we checked our email and saw there was an auto-reply that this person would be on vacation and won't have access to email.  It stated they would be on vacation until mid April...this was in January.  No heads up, no explanation, no one else to work with, just gone for 4 months.  We never got the full explanation of what happened but not a whole lot got done in those 4 months.

 

If I told work I would be out for 4 months they would say to say never come back.  Heck I think if I tried to leave for 3 weeks they'd say the same thing.


That sounds a lot like an emergency FML Act was put in place.  Hippa would prevent details.

 

And since I have a calibrated 8-Ball handy:

~~~Did working with Brian on a daily basis necessitate emergency intensive inpatient psychiatric care?~~~

"You Can Rely On It"

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Notice I said they were in another country, so FMLA, and Hippa don't apply, but their country likely had some equivalent and likely more comprehensive set of laws.


Unofficial Forum Rules and Guidelines - Hooovahh - LabVIEW Overlord
Interesting in learning all you can about automotive CAN bus communication? Checkout my 12 part CAN Blog series.

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This is part of a larger story but I'm trying to figure out what details need to be kept in or left out, or what the statute of limitations are.  So I was working at a place and things went sour.  My boss changed several times, restructuring, and other issues.  The person who eventually became my boss had never been a boss before, and didn't understand our department or what we did.  He never assigned me work, or kept tabs on me, he never knew what I was working on, or what I had accomplished, yet he did my performance reviews and controlled my bonuses and raise.  In the first performance review he called me "unapproachable", the next year he called me "abrasive" and told other coworkers to "stop their bitching" when they complained about the department.  He didn't like me, and didn't want to interact with me.

 

So after this I decided to have a little game to see how long he would go between talking to me.  I told a few coworkers about this game and was curious how far out of his way he would go to not interact with me.  He sat a couple aisles over from me, but it had been over two months of not seeing him, or even receiving an email.  I was working with someone in the build area working on a project.  My boss came in and started asking about the progress of what we were doing.  After he left the coworker said "Well I guess two months is the limit", and I said "No it is still going, did you notice he never once looked at me, or addressed me."  The three of us were in a circle a few feet from each other but he did all he could to avoid me.  I don't remember how far it went, but I do know I put in my two weeks and never heard from him in those two weeks.  There was no knowledge transfer before I left, no one knew what the SCC was, let alone where it was, or how the source for any project worked.  I mostly worked alone and no one was interviewed to replace me before I left.

 

There's a lot more to this story involving my good bye email, some Yes Men, and restructuring, but I think those will have to wait a little longer...


Unofficial Forum Rules and Guidelines - Hooovahh - LabVIEW Overlord
Interesting in learning all you can about automotive CAN bus communication? Checkout my 12 part CAN Blog series.

Message 143 of 165
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Serendipity rises again! I was just thinking about this thread after being introduced to my new coworkers as...

 

The new LabVIEW Jedi.  

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Message 144 of 165
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Honestly I have to keep it going so that I don't forget all my stories.  Enough time needs to pass that those involved are less likely to be identified, but not so much time passing that I forget them.  I have a Google doc now with a draft of a few of them.  What is LabVIEW's equivalent of the midichlorian?


Unofficial Forum Rules and Guidelines - Hooovahh - LabVIEW Overlord
Interesting in learning all you can about automotive CAN bus communication? Checkout my 12 part CAN Blog series.

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Message 145 of 165
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@Hooovahh wrote:

Honestly I have to keep it going so that I don't forget all my stories.  Enough time needs to pass that those involved are less likely to be identified, but not so much time passing that I forget them.  I have a Google doc now with a draft of a few of them.  What is LabVIEW's equivalent of the midichlorian?


A Global.  <ducks>

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Message 146 of 165
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Highlighted

Failure to communicate

 

I was a young engineer working at my first real job.  I was still in college, and would work for 3 months, then go to classes for 3 months back and forth.  At this company we made a custom test system for a customer. The customer was so happy that they ordered several more after the first systems were deployed, and several more the following year.  I came in after a semester at school and found that the customer had asked for a few more test systems to be made. Being a young intern I never really interacted with the customer much, and the fact that I would be unreachable for 3 months at a time meant my work generally was given to me by a more senior engineer.  I also wasn't involved in any program management meetings, or meetings about the project at all. In these early days I was a minion who was given work to do, and I did it. So as a young minion and being familiar with this tester design I was given the task to build up a new duplicate tester. The hardware guys built it up, I loaded the software, and started troubleshooting any issues.  The types of issues I'd find were usually incorrect wiring, or wiring that crimped the shield so connections weren't made, and a few other minor things. To troubleshoot this it usually meant checking wiring with a meter, and a oscilloscope and usually involved a power supply to power up some part of the stand manually to check things out.

 

I was working through the integration of this tester, fixing issues getting this tester working.  When I was working on the stand I would clean up a bit at the end of the day, but leave most of the equipment in the tester like a scope and power supply because I knew the next day I would be working on it.  So one day I left to go home, and the next I came in to work on the tester and it was gone. Odd I thought, wonder why they moved it. So I asked one of the hardware guys where my tester was and he said "Oh they shipped that out this morning."...my heart sank.  Uhh...okay thanks.  My work wasn't done, it didn't work, and it was in a state of integration.  I then realized that no meeting, no emails, and no updates were asked, or given to the senior engineers on the project. They just gave me a task, gave no due date, and assumed it was done so they shipped it out. A few days later the customer calls up very upset.  They complained about wires pulled out of the terminals, and hardware like power supplies just sitting in the tester not hooked up. After a few conversations I came to think that everyone had forgotten I was even given the task. No one was pointing fingers but eventually the senior engineer on the project flew out to the customers site and fixed all their issues.


Unofficial Forum Rules and Guidelines - Hooovahh - LabVIEW Overlord
Interesting in learning all you can about automotive CAN bus communication? Checkout my 12 part CAN Blog series.

Message 147 of 165
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I'm fond of telling new engineers that you haven't truly lived until you've been responsible for a customer quality issue Smiley Happy

 

My favourite was rolling out an update to the code which refactored some EEPROM configuration. My refactoring missed a crucial cluster where instead of wiring into Bundle By Name from a previous cluster, I had a constant...containing zeroes. Naive testing methods meant I didn't spot it, and poor validation of the process output meant others didn't either.

 

We recalled a few hundred units of a product during early life, reworked and replaced FOC. Costly and embarrassing, but necessary for the lessons I subsequently learned...

---
CLA
Message 148 of 165
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@Hooovahh wrote:

Failure to communicate

 

I was a young engineer working at my first real job.  I was still in college, ...


Sea Story Time!

 

I was in the Navy and responsible  for keeping a radar system (AN/SPS 58A) working. It was a piece of crap design that was always down on every ship that was so equipped. I took on the challenge of figuring out why it did not work (noisy power supplies induced noise in the transmitted signal plus an automatic gain control that required manual adjustment CONSTANTLY!) and eventually figured how to fix it.

 

The vendor support engineer had to visit because it was quickly noticed that the radar worked on my ship but nowhere else.

 

Soon after returning from being deployed to the Med, I took some leave and when I returned I found the equipment cabinets had been stripped of all of the electronics and there was a pile of parts on the deck in front of the cabinet.

 

Since another ship was about to deploy that had a down system they decided to take all of electronics and install them in the other ship. Very depressing.

 

I spent the next week living in the equipment room with schematics in my lap and only left to eat. I eventually got it back up and working (after some unorthodox solutions) and again the status of my radar was changed from "red" to "green". Meanwhile the other ship never got their radar up and operating using my parts.

 

I would have been willing to explain how but nobody asked.

 

Ben 

Message 149 of 165
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@Ben wrote:

@Hooovahh wrote:

Failure to communicate

 

I was a young engineer working at my first real job.  I was still in college, ...


Sea Story Time!

 

I was in the Navy and responsible  for keeping a radar system (AN/SPS 58A) working. It was a piece of crap design that was always down...


Example of just how funky that radar was...

 

Being a search radar it had the ability (cough cough hack hack) to superimpose the IFF (Information Friend or Foe) over the friendly targets. It simply did not work on any of the ships.

 

I eventually discovered that when the radar console was installed the cable for the IFF feed was attached to the wrong connector on the back of the console! I move the cable and the IFF started working.

 

You wouda thought...

 

Ben

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