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NyRe
Posts: 6
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Re: How do you like to learn LabVIEW?

Well, I took a course of fundamentals about 2 years ago, and since then it's mostly me and LabView Help. The help is, in fact, quite well-written and many cases don't require examples to understand. Example VI's are the second in priority, although I usually feel better just taking the function, writing a test VI and just watching how it handles different input values.

As for the improvements, I sure wouldn't mind some more detailed help on variants and other complex datatypes. (I still can't get a sufficient understanding on how a picture variable is stored. It's a flattened string, apparently, but that's all I could get from help and examples.)

As for errors, sometimes you don't want to merge errors and have separate error handlers for (as an example) file I/O errors and ActiveX object errors instead. If these sections of the code don't interact, why should errors in one of them prohibit the execution of another?
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Albert.Geven
Posts: 3,325
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Re: How do you like to learn LabVIEW?

Hi

error handling mostly cannot be done automatically.
expected errors can be handled and converted into an action that removes the rror,
but you always have errors that have to move to the upper level and either signal the user, get logged or even halt the program.
Always when one of those errors occurs it is very important not to mask it with a later error.
That is why all calling functions should do nothing (especially not changing the error) when an error is already present.
That and that alone is the reason that when an error is available the normal way is not to do anything.
Maybe someone wil argument that speed is important, but when an error has occurred speed is not important at all.
The only thing important is clarity.

greetings from the Netherlands
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Ray.R
Posts: 10,575
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Re: How do you like to learn LabVIEW?

Sorry for the Exttremely Late reply:  (and the fact I didn't read other people's psosts --- sorry guys/gals ---)

 

The best way I learned proper LV coding was to take NI courses.  The membership program was fantastic.  Just wished they )NI) would offer a sustainability program where you can renew the membership every year for something less than $500 / year.  After all, you wouldn't be taking basic courses over again... Unless you had time to network with new potetntial customers..  :smileywink:   

______________________________________________________________________
Kudos!!!! Gimme Kudos!!!! It's that little golden star on the left below my avatar... :smileyhappy:
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Kenny_K
Posts: 486
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Re: How do you like to learn LabVIEW?

They way that I learned was by looking at some examples, coding for a bit, getting help on a forum if needed, taking the intermediate class, coding some more, try the help/examples again, take the advanced course, code some more.  Basiclly, code code code and you will learn a lot more, to a point.  I wish I had someone else to bounce ideas off of at work, but that is what the forums are for :smileyhappy:

I agree that the labview help is pretty good, but I would like to see more explaination on some of the properites and methods (activeX, .net, etc).  When they only give you what is required for an input, and there is no example (that you can find) using that property, it is tough to determine what it is used for or with.
Kenny
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rolfk
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Re: How do you like to learn LabVIEW?

[ Edited ]


Kenny K wrote:

I agree that the labview help is pretty good, but I would like to see more explaination on some of the properites and methods (activeX, .net, etc).  When they only give you what is required for an input, and there is no example (that you can find) using that property, it is tough to determine what it is used for or with.


Well, LabVIEW only can present to you what it finds in the type library. And that is created by the developer of the AcitveX control, or .Net assembly. So if they don't have more information in there, LabVIEW can not show you more. As to having examples that is kind of a thankless task. The most common ones (Microsoft Office) do change interfaces between versions regularly, breaking earlier examples and the zillion other ActiveX controls out there are simply to much and very often exotic too, to even think about doing much work for.
 
The best source of information for such controls is usually from the original developer and if that information is missing or sucks LabVIEW can really not create it magically. Of course there are not to many ActiveX developers that can provide you with ready made LabVIEW VIs, but a good Visual Basic example is usally already a great help, just from looking at the Basic code.
 
Rolf Kalbermatter


Message Edited by rolfk on 11-08-2007 08:28 PM
Rolf Kalbermatter
CIT Engineering Netherlands
a division of Test & Measurement Solutions
LabVIEW ArchitectLabVIEW ChampionLabVIEW Instructor
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Kenny_K
Posts: 486
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Re: How do you like to learn LabVIEW?

rolfk,

I understand that it is a pretty thankless job. 

An example of what I am talking about:  Automating Lotus notes emails.  There is the send invoke node, and one of the required inputs is Recipients.  This is a variant input.  Under the help it has no description on what the invoke node does or what you would wire to it to "make it work".  The Lotus Notes website has a list of all the methods and properties, but on their sheet too, it is listed under NotesDocument, Send(attachform, [recipients]).  Again, there is no information on what to wire to it (number, array, boolean). You almost have to know what to do, before you do it.  I did find an example on the forums, so I was able to follow the example and figure it out, but if I had not seen the example, I would have been clueless on what to wire to the recipients input (to Ni's credit, the attachform is colored green for a boolean, so that was easy to figure out).

I am not sure if NI leaves it as a variant to "future proof" it, incase IBM does decide to change it, but I think it would propigate automatically when you installed a version of Notes, without having to update labview.

I hope I explained it well enough.:smileyindifferent:
Kenny